atypical lobular hyperplasia


Also found in: Acronyms.

atypical lobular hyperplasia

A relatively uncommon lesion of the female breast characterised by lobules containing uniform dyshesive epithelial cells with eccentric nuclei, often accompanied by intracytoplasmic mucin vacuoles (so-called“private acini”); the surrounding myoepithelial cell layer is retained. It is a non-palpable lesion seen in 1% to 3.6% of female breasts and carries a general increase in the risk of future breast cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical lobular hyperplasia and potential roles for gains and losses of genetic material in breast neoplasia.
24 for those with atypical lobular hyperplasia, and 8.
a) Significant pathologic findings include atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive carcinoma.
An MMP-9-positive / ADAM 12-negative urine sample conferred a 40% chance that the patient had LCIS and a 25% chance that she had atypical ductal hyperplasia or atypical lobular hyperplasia.
An MMP-9-positive/ADAM12-negative urine sample conferred a 40% chance that the patient had LCIS and a 25% chance that she had atypical ductal hyperplasia or atypical lobular hyperplasia.
As pathologists we need to use uniform criteria and terminology in the diagnosis of atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, and FEA.
The term lobular neoplasia (LN) was introduced by Haagensen et al (1) in 1978 and encompasses the spectrum of disease including atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), the latter of which is further divided into classic and pleomorphic types.
Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) are infrequent findings in needle core biopsy samples, occurring in approximately 0.
Four cases had concurrent atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and one had atypical lobular hyperplasia.
Importantly, in most cases, classic lobular carcinoma in situ or atypical lobular hyperplasia is found adjacent to the PLCIS.
Although other definitions exist, the threshold used in this study for the distinction of LCIS versus atypical lobular hyperplasia was involvement of at least 75% of the units of a lobule.
Page et al (6) reviewed follow-up data on 261 benign breast biopsies with atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) taken from 252 women between 1950 and 1985.

Full browser ?