atypical glandular cells


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Related to atypical glandular cells: Atypical Glandular Cells of Undetermined Significance

atypical glandular cells

A term of art—usually abbreviated as AGS—which is used in the 2001 Bethesda system (for evaluating cervical cytology) to replace AGUS (atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance), and which attempts to identify whether the cells are endometrial, endocervical, or unqualified.

atypical glandular cells

Abbreviation: AGC
An abnormal finding on a Pap test. This classification is divided into “favor neoplasia” or “not otherwise specified (NOS).” NOS is subdivided into endocervical or endometrial origin. Atypical endocervical cells are important because of their risk for significant disease.
Synonym: atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance
See also: cell
References in periodicals archive ?
Atypical glandular cells in conventional cervical smears: Incidence and follow EJC 2000, 36: 2240-2243.
Any woman with a cytologic diagnosis of Atypical Glandular cells: NOS or Atypical Endometrial cells: NOS should be closely followed, as a significant proportion of such cases are found to have neoplastic cervical and uterine pathology subsequently.
Clinical significance of atypical glandular cells in Pap tests: an analysis of more than 3000 cases at a large academic women's center.
The 2006 ASCCP guidelines suggest 3 possible options for the management of a patient with an Atypical Glandular Cells Papanicolaou test with colposcopic biopsy showing CIN 1 and a negative endocervical curettage: (1) excisional procedure; (2) review of all findings; or (3) follow-up with subsequent Papanicolaou and colposcopy in 6 months.
(9) These aggregated lymphocytes can also lead to potential misinterpretation as atypical glandular cells or as adenocarcinoma.
Patients with either prior atypical glandular cells results or both LSIL and ASC-H results were listed separately.
Cytologic diagnoses included 10 cases (5.3%) of ASC-US, 55 cases (29.1%) of LSIL, 31 cases (16.4%) of LSIL-H, 21 cases (11.1%) of ASC-H, 68 cases (36.0%) of HSIL, 1 case (0.5%) of atypical glandular cells (AGCs), 1 case (0.5%) of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), and 2 cases (1.1%) of squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) (Figure 2).
When asked which interpretive rates were felt to not be useful, most comments included relatively rare but significant interpretations such as atypical glandular cells, atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H), and cancer.
Most laboratories (71.4%) responded that only HSIL+ or adenocarcinoma in situ+ prompt a 5-year review, while 15% of laboratories also rescreen Pap tests from patients with atypical glandular cells. Smaller percentages of laboratories review Pap tests from patients with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) (8.6%); atypical squamous cells, undetermined significance (ASCUS) (6.8%); and atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) (2.3%).
When asked about the type of discrepancy that prompts a comment in the biopsy report, 89% (235 of 264) use a normal biopsy result and an HSIL Pap test result, 70.8% (187 of 264) consider NILM and CIN 2-3 worthy of comment, 71.6% (189 of 264) comment on a normal biopsy result with an LSIL result, 60.2% (159 of 264) comment on NILM results with a CIN 1 biopsy, 62.5% (165 of 264) comment on ASC-H and a normal biopsy result, and 62.1% (164 of 264) remark on atypical glandular cells (AGC) or cancer on a biopsy when the Pap test result is NILM (Table 5).

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