atypical chest pain

atypical chest pain

A term of variable application for chest pain that is sudden, sharp and short-lived. The term’s use is inconsistent: some doctors use the term as a means of referring a patient to another service or consultant/specialist; others recommend deleting the phrase from the working medical parlance.
References in periodicals archive ?
MDCT angiography was performed in 75% (n=6) of Type 1A VAR patients because of atypical chest pain and nonspecific ECG changes whereas two others were performed due to family risk factors for coronary artery disease.
All the patients who reported for their cardiac magnetic resonance imaging during our study duration due to atypical chest pain or suspected coronary artery disease were recruited in the study while patients with prosthetic valve, cardiac devices or claustrophobic patients were excluded.
This can be attributed to atypical chest pain in women.
Approximately half of these patients are asymptomatic and undergo cardiac catheterization because of a continuous precordial murmur.2 The clinical presentations in symptomatic patients can vary from angina, atypical chest pain, syncope, dyspnoea, palpitation, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and can even lead to sudden cardiac death.4 Our patient had symptoms of chest pain and dyspnoea which could be due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or coronary fistula.
According to the medical records, Shah, 62, who was declared 'Prisoner of Conscience' by the Amnesty International for not budging before New Delhi despite years of imprisonment, is suffering from multiple ailments like hypertension, diabetes, mellitus, dyslipidemias, atypical chest pain, BHP, cervical spondylitis, lumbar spondylitis, osteoarthritis in both knees besides being on regular medication for three attacks of sudden loss of consciousness.
Other counterarguments were the absence of coronary risk factors, and the atypical chest pain. Also, in young patient coronary spasm related to hypocalcemia is one of the mechanisms involved in the chest pain occurrence [6].
A 74-year-old woman presented in 2012 with atypical chest pain and was diagnosed with non--ST elevation myocardial infarction based on rise and fall in cardiac troponin T [(cTnT).sup.3] concentrations (Table 1) despite a negative cardiac workup.
Non-invasive tests are therefore important in validating angina, and in quantifying the severity, as well as in the evaluation of atypical chest pain. In clinical practice the Exercise Stress Test (EST) remains the commonest non-invasive technique used to provide physiological evidence of myocardial ischemia.
(8) Additional common indications for CCTA include patients with 1) typical or atypical chest pain and normal or equivocal stress tests and/or ECG findings; 2) unexplained or atypical chest pain with low risk for CAD and a possible coronary artery anomaly; 3) unexplained acute chest pain with low or intermediate risk, negative cardiac enzymes, and normal or equivocal ECG findings; and 4) preoperative or pre-procedural evaluation of the coronary arteries.
She also developed recurrent atypical chest pain and mid-epigastric pain, occurring intermittently during her treatment, several times per week for 4 to 5 five years.

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