attrition

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attrition

 [ah-trĭ´shun]
the wearing away of a substance or structure (such as the teeth) in the course of normal use.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·tri·tion

(ă-trish'ŭn),
1. Wearing away by friction or rubbing.
2. In dentistry, physiologic loss of tooth structure caused by the abrasive character of food or by bruxism. Compare: abrasion.
[L. at-tero, pp. -tritus, to rub against, rub away]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

attrition

The dropping out of a participant in a trial or study.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·tri·tion

(ă-trish'ŭn)
1. Wearing away by friction or rubbing.
2. In dentistry, physiologic loss of tooth structure caused by normal wear inherent in the aging process, as well as by the abrasive character of food or by bruxism.
Compare: abrasion
3. The loss of participants over the course of a study, which can create bias and threaten the internal validity of the study.
[L. at-tero, pp. -tritus, to rub against, rub away]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

at·tri·tion

(ă-trish'ŭn)
1. In dentistry, physiologic loss of tooth structure caused by normal wear inherent in the aging process, as well as by the abrasive character of food or by bruxism.
2. Wearing away by friction or rubbing.
[L. at-tero, pp. -tritus, to rub against, rub away]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In light of the fact that (1) the Air Force wishes to minimize attrition from UPT, (2) the IFS program has significantly decreased the number of flying hours completed by students before entering UPT, and (3) all entrants to UPT have satisfactorily completed Medical Flight Screening but have less flying experience, it is time to assess the impact of the program change.
Categories of attrition included DOR, medical reasons (MED), failure in academic or flying performance (Flying/Academic), and lack of adaptability (LOA)--which includes students who withdrew due to fear of flying, persistent airsickness, or manifestations of apprehension.
Next, the study evaluated reasons for DOR attrition. The author contacted the UPT bases again to gather information on students' underlying reasons for their DOR.