attrition

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attrition

 [ah-trĭ´shun]
the wearing away of a substance or structure (such as the teeth) in the course of normal use.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·tri·tion

(ă-trish'ŭn),
1. Wearing away by friction or rubbing.
2. In dentistry, physiologic loss of tooth structure caused by the abrasive character of food or by bruxism. Compare: abrasion.
[L. at-tero, pp. -tritus, to rub against, rub away]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

attrition

The dropping out of a participant in a trial or study.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·tri·tion

(ă-trish'ŭn)
1. Wearing away by friction or rubbing.
2. In dentistry, physiologic loss of tooth structure caused by normal wear inherent in the aging process, as well as by the abrasive character of food or by bruxism.
Compare: abrasion
3. The loss of participants over the course of a study, which can create bias and threaten the internal validity of the study.
[L. at-tero, pp. -tritus, to rub against, rub away]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

at·tri·tion

(ă-trish'ŭn)
1. In dentistry, physiologic loss of tooth structure caused by normal wear inherent in the aging process, as well as by the abrasive character of food or by bruxism.
2. Wearing away by friction or rubbing.
[L. at-tero, pp. -tritus, to rub against, rub away]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Chair of Nurse Executives of New Zealand (NENZ) Denise Kivell said the 42 per cent attrition rate represented five per cent attrition rate per year over eight years.
The purpose of this retrospective, longitudinal correlational study was to examine the associations among language, participation in a reading comprehension program, and attrition rates of pre-licensure nursing students in Texas.
Since the work of Spady (1970) and Tinto's article in 1975, there has been considerable theoretical work related to students' attrition rates in higher education.
Chang and her associates conducted the current study to determine whether higher minority attrition rates also would be observed in studies of complementary or alternative medication (CAM), namely St.
Emma Cordiner, whose business Denalli is ideally placed at Doxford International Park, believes that the increasing demands placed upon contact centre staff can account for poor productivity, high attrition rates and spiralling costs.
This represented an annual FOF attrition rate of over eight per cent, nearly double the previous record set in Q4 2008.
The similarity between voluntary and involuntary attrition rates could be due to this reason.
The company said it expects the impact on full-time employees should be minimal at the current attrition rate. The staff changes are scheduled to begin around March 9.
Due of this, customers have a very low attrition rate. Additionally, fibre optic is a medium that is ideally suited to support services such as VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) and IPTV (Internet Protocol Television).
In one study conducted at the Long Island College Hospital, a supportive intervention that assigned a nurse advocate to directly support newly graduated nurses succeeded in retaining 29 of 30 newly hired graduates i year after hiring, versus a hospital-wide attrition rate of 25% for newly graduated nurses (Anderson, 1989).
In response Frost says the country must invest in skills training to contain a high attrition rate and must address a belief in the market that South African telecoms costs are amongst the highest in the world.