attribute

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attribute

noun A term of art used in data modelling for a specific datum that can be collected for a class.

attribute

(ă-tri′būt″) [L., attribuere, to assign, ascribe]
1. To assign a cause.
2. To explain, e.g., a phenomenon or an event.
3. To predicate, e.g., a theory on a piece of evidence.
References in periodicals archive ?
If an attributor is in a context of suspicion and doubt, that context can be eased somewhat by relying on the permissive rules to allow the consideration of information, doubts about which may be ignored, where those considerations are not defeated by the other rules.
When you realize this easily you see that what is to be separated is the subject's and the attributor's utterances but not their languages.
Publishers turn to content recognition systems such as Attributor to help uncover pirated content and enforce their copyrights.
Anonymity of clients can be ensured with the client attributor code often constructed on the basis of date of birth, initials at birth, and gender.
Among those presenting at the conference were Brill's Journalism Online, Attributor, and Alan Mutter, a Silicon Valley executive who presented a plan for something he calls View Pass, a onetime registration system for the Web that would track consumers as they move among newspaper websites.
The attributor begins with a known effect of a sought-after state, often an observable piece of behavior.
Attributor found a site that had posted the first 10 chapters of the title.
Established in 2006, Attributor (Redwood City, CA) is a start-up that has launched a new service that scans the web to fingerprint pages for copyrighted audio, video, images and text in order to give publishers a way to request that sites carrying the material either pay for the content or take it down.
"A startup called Attributor in Redwood City, Calif., says it can monitor the web for copied content no matter where it may be, help publishers and media companies track it all, and help them decide what to do about it," writes technology expert Erick Schonfeld in TechCrunch.
He also complains that I have described Perkins (who undoubtedly had a first-rate eye for Sienese pictures) as 'simply an attributor of paintings' ...
Empirical investigation of investment (and saving) motivation is rare (exceptions are Furnham, 1985, Warneryd, 1999) and usually relies on the interpretations people place on their own behavior and consequently are prone to what social psychologists refer to as 'attributor bias' (Ross, 1977).
Kelley (1971) notes a second reason we make attributions: "The attributor is not simply an attributor, a seeker after knowledge; his latent goal in attaining knowledge is that of effective management of himself and his environment".