attributable fraction


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Related to attributable fraction: Population Attributable Risk, Attributable risk

attributable fraction

The percentage of instances of an illness that can be accounted for by a particular risk factor. For example, people exposed to asbestos have a certain risk of developing lung cancer, and if they also smoke tobacco, they are also at risk from that factor. These risks may be estimated from cohort studies.
Synonym: additional risk; attributable risk
See also: fraction
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References in periodicals archive ?
In order to comprehensively estimate the mortality burden attributable to temperatures in urban and rural counties, we also estimated the attributable fractions of mortality considering the temporal relationships between human exposure and RRs (Gasparrini and Leone 2014).
Population attributable fractions for colorectal cancer and red and processed meats in Colombia--a macro-simulation study.
Weinberg, "Use and misuse of population attributable fractions," American Journal of Public Health, vol.
Estimated influenza virus attributable fraction (AF) and AF trends across age groups among outpatients with influenza-like illness, Klerksdorp and Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, May 2012-April 2016.
Second, the Spanish study used an earlier version of a US standard software to determine attributable fractions, which does not include the latest knowledge with respect to alcohol-attributable mortality (Rehm et al., 2010a).
This input would be useful for either calculating the attributable fraction of prevalent asthma for the specific population, or to be included in a meta-analysis of relevant studies.
The excess rate ratio attributable to radon is calculated for each sex-age-smoking category and the attributable fraction is calculated using Equation 1:
Improving population attributable fraction methods: Examining smoking-attributable mortality for 87 geographic regions in Canada.
The population attributable fraction (PAF) was estimated as pd x [(OR 1)/OR] x 100, where pd is the proportion of total asthma cases arising from the exposure category (21), and the odds ratio (OR) was used instead of a prevalence rate ratio (PRR) (22).
This was estimated by a discrete version of the generalised potential impact fraction (PIF) (5) for continuous exposures, or a multi-level extension of the usual attributable fraction formula when the exposure variable had several categories.