attractant

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attractant

(ə-trăk′tənt)
n.
A substance, such as a pheromone, that attracts insects or other animals.

attractant

a material used to attract animals for capture purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
PEST CONTROL PLATFORM: LARGE AREA ATTRACTANTS -- MegaCatch(TM) Mosquito Trap -- Light & sound technology combine to attract and then trap mosquitoes and provide maximum coverage with minimal maintenance.
In the past, testing mosquito attractants required a brave volunteer to place an arm into a cage full of the insects.
April 28 /PRNewswire/ -- In accordance with tighter fishing regulations, increased angling pressure and a commitment to provide anglers with new innovative products, Pautzke Bait Company, well known for its Balls O' Fire salmon eggs is pleased to announce two new colors its popular Nectar attractant.
Sexual attractants, which include doe-in-heat and buck-in-rut urine, are among the strongest scents.
In field tests, Knight verified that the pear-derived attractant is more effective than pheromones in monitoring--and potentially predicting--mating and egg laying.
Attractants can be used as nontoxic baits in mosquito traps for surveillance purposes.
This product uses Consep's proprietary technology to control the release of the attractant over time.
No long-range attractants have shown up in related beetles, but that doesn't faze Stephen Teale of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF) in Syracuse.
Ordinarily, when a male nitidulid beetle gets a whiff of a favorite fermenting food, he makes his own chemical attractants to call males and females alike to join in one big feeding party.
DON'T LEAVE BEAR ATTRACTANTS OUTSIDE -- Bear attractants include garbage, pet food, and basically anything smelly or edible.
Theoretically, drugs that inhibit the syncytia's attractants might slow the immune system decline that occurs in AIDS, he says.
Kline and his research team journeyed to the Everglades to conduct preliminary studies on octenol and carbon dioxide, two environmentally friendly chemicals that showed promise as attractants for the salt marsh mosquito species Aedes taeniorhynchus.