attitude

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Related to attitudinally: pertaining, proceed with, reared

attitude

 [at´ĭ-to̳d]
1. a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd),
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. social or clinical psychology a relatively stable and enduring predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

/at·ti·tude/ (at´ĭ-tldbomacd)
1. a position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

attitude

[at′ətyo̅o̅d, -to̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, aptitude, fitness
1 a body position or posture, particularly the fetal position in the uterus, as determined by the degree of flexion of the head and extremities.
2 (in psychiatry) any of the major integrative forces in the development of personality that gives consistency to an individual's behavior. Attitudes are cognitive in nature, formed through interactions with the environment. They reflect the person's innermost convictions about situations good or bad, right or wrong, desirable or undesirable.

attitude

Anatomy
The position and relation of the body and body parts to each other, i.e., posture.

Psychology
A mental disposition or mindset. Attitude is a tendency, based on one’s beliefs and experience, to react to events in certain ways and approach or avoid events that confirm or challenge personal values.

attitude

Psychology “…the tendency towards a mode of response, toward the object in question.” See Abstract attitude.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. psychology A predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a relatively enduring evaluative reaction to other individuals, situations or objects, which may be positive or negative. Typically defined as comprising affective cognitive and behavioural components.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of behavior.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another. See also posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
The product is more than a dozen reported investigations which, in the overwhelming consensus of commentators, have confirmed three empirical hypotheses: (1) jurors excluded because of their inability to impose the death penalty are more attitudinally disposed to favor the accused than are non-excluded jurors; (2) excluded jurors are more likely to be black or female than non-excluded jurors; and (3) excluded jurors are more likely to actually acquit the accused than non-excluded jurors.
Your "company" is doing business with Hospital X for the present time (they provide your paycheck), but attitudinally you must think of them as your customer more than as your employer.
The pattern in other countries has been to clear space both attitudinally and jurisdictionally for Indigenous structures in the nation-state and then in the next phase to make them effective and responsive.
We see this reflected attitudinally in their tolerance and acceptance of lifestyles.
Are women's name-yoiks substantively or attitudinally different from men's?
in such circumstances, their use of 'that' will be indicative of their dislike or aversion: they will be distancing themselves emotionally or attitudinally from whatever they are referring to.
So our challenge was making sure the company was structurally and attitudinally ready for that kind of increase.
With these words, Catherine moves attitudinally towards androgyny.
Importantly, organizational commitment in this study, was measured attitudinally and was not highly predictive of the behavior of volunteers.
But the reports seem to indicate that such measures will be inadequate for the long term; more substantial changes both institutionally and attitudinally may be required.
But few feel equipped, operationally or attitudinally, to project themselves into larger international marketplaces.
In an article on future research library models, emphasis was placed on the need to educate existing staff, both attitudinally and technologically, "to work in a more collaborative manner .