attic

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attic

 [at´ik]
a small upper space of the middle ear, containing the head of the malleus and the body of the incus.

ep·i·tym·pa·num

(ep'i-tim'pă-nŭm),
The upper portion of the tympanic cavity or middle ear above the tympanic membrane; it contains the head of the malleus and the body of the incus.
References in classic literature ?
But our attic, unique though it was, had by no means exhausted the architect's sense of humor.
It is a long time ago now that I last saw the inside of an attic. I have tried various floors since but I have not found that they have made much difference to me.
He groped his way carefully for several yards; he was at the back of the skirting- board in the attic, where there is a little mark * in the picture.
While Tom Kitten was left alone under the floor of the attic, he wriggled about and tried to mew for help.
"execution of roof and sohlabdichtungsarbeiten in the new building and inventory renovation - 3 700 sqm vapor barrier on flat roofs and attics, - 3 300 eps gradient thermal insulation on flat roofs, - 3 700 sealing as a rubber epdm film system on flat roofs and attics, - 170 running meters of attic training and attic cover made of powder-coated aluminum, - 1 100 sqm of extensive green roofs, - 3,200 square meters of bitumen-welded floor sealing.
Summary: California [USA], February 18 (ANI): Attics are wonderful places, they hold memories and plenty of other long forgotten things such as an Apple IIe.
You can use open-cell, low-density foam in attics, both North and South.
And while not every find hits the financial jackpot, the average value of hidden gems found in British attics comes in at PS348.
Charlotte Bronte gives proof of the room's figural durability when she converts Richardson's lumber-room into one of the most memorable attics in literature.
Attics, largely ignored and often unprotected, can be the source of catastrophic losses.
Even a brief research will tell you that most of the vermiculite insulation put in attics between 1920 and 1990 came from a mine in Libby, Montana, that also had asbestos in it, and according to the EPA, "assume it has asbestos in it.'' Sure wish I was told then, since my husband has been up in that attic a lot.
Natural convection and heat transfer in attics subject to periodic thermal forcing.