atropine


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atropine

 [at´ro-pēn]
an anticholinergic alkaloid found in belladonna; it acts as a competitive antagonist of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, blocking stimulation of muscles and glands by parasympathetic and cholinergic sympathetic nerves; used as the sulfate salt as a smooth muscle relaxant, as an antiarrhythmic, as a preanesthetic to reduce secretions, as an antidote to poisoning by organophosphorus compounds, cholinesterase inhibitors, or muscarine, and as a mydriatic and cycloplegic.
atropine poisoning severe toxic reaction due to overdosage of atropine. Symptoms include dryness of mouth, thirst, difficulty in swallowing, dilated pupils, tachycardia, fever, delirium, stupor, and a rash on the face, neck, and upper trunk.

Treatment of atropine poisoning: This will depend on the patient, dose, and route of administration. A poison control center and emergency service should be contacted immediately if poisoning occurs in the home. Measures to be anticipated in the clinical setting include airway maintenance, monitoring, control of temperature, lavage, and sometimes administration of activated charcoal.

at·ro·pine

(at'rō-pēn),
A racemic mixture of d- and l- hyoscyamine, alkaloids obtained from the leaves and roots of Atropa belladonna; an anticholinergic, with diverse effects (tachycardia, mydriasis, cycloplegia, constipation, urinary retention, antisudorific) attributable to reversible competitive blockade of acetylcholine at muscarinic type cholinergic receptors; most commonly used in the treatment of poisoning with organophosphate insecticides or nerve gases, as well as certain types of bradydysrhythmias and to prevent secretions during preparation for general anesthesia. The (-) form is by far the more active.

atropine

(ăt′rə-pēn′, -pĭn) also

atropin

(-pĭn)
n.
A poisonous, bitter, crystalline alkaloid, C17H23NO3, obtained from belladonna and other related plants. It is used to dilate the pupils of the eyes and as an antispasmodic.

atropine

Therapeutics A racemic mixture of toxic alkaloids extracted from Atropa belladonna, a competitive antagonist of anticholinergics Effects Tachycardia, ↓ salivation, GI motility–constipation, sweating, cycloplegia, mydriasis, urinary retention, bronchodilation Therapeutic use Bronchodilator, reverses effects of organophosphate pesticides, nerve gases Contraindications Narrow-angle glaucoma, synechiae between iris and lens, GI obstruction, obstructive uropathy, megacolon, GERD, unstable cardiovascular disease and acute hemorrhage, tachycardia, myasthenia gravis

atropine

A bitter, poisonous alkaloid obtained from the plant Atropa belladonna (‘deadly nightshade’) and the seeds of the Thorn-apple. It blocks acetyl choline receptors and is used to relax spasm in smooth muscle in the intestines and other organs. It is also extensively used by ophthalmologists to dilate the pupil of the eye in the treatment of inflammatory disease and sometimes to facilitate examination. The drug is on the WHO official list. The generic term derives from the Greek a , not, and tropos , turning. Atropos was one of the three fates noted for her inexorable tendency to cut the thread of life.

atropine

a poisonous chemical obtained from the deadly nightshade that prevents depolarization of the postsynaptic membrane and therefore prevents synaptic transmission, in a similar way to CURARE. It is used medicinally in preanaesthetic medication and to treat peptic ulcers, renal and biliary colic, etc.

Atropine

A poisonous alkaloid obtained from belladonna or related plants, used medically to dilate the pupils of the eyes and to stop spasms.
Mentioned in: Fugu Poisoning

atropine 

An alkaloid obtained from the belladonna plant. It is an antimuscarinic drug. In the eye it acts as a mydriatic and as a cycloplegic. It paralyses the pupillary sphincter and the ciliary muscle by preventing the action of acetylcholine at the parasympathetic nerve endings. See acetylcholine; cycloplegia; mydriatic.

at·ro·pine

(at'rō-pēn)
Mixture of d- and l- hyoscyamine, alkaloids obtained from the leaves and roots of Atropa belladonna; an anticholinergic, with diverse effects attributable to reversible competitive blockade of acetylcholine at muscarinic type cholinergic receptors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, the slowing of myopia progression with ortho-k alone is comparable to that of soft multi-focal lenses and low-dose atropine.
Timing May Influence the Pharmacodynamics of Atropine as Pre-Medication.
A newer model, the ATNAA (Antidote Treatment Nerve Agent Auto-Injector), (1) has both the atropine and the 2-PAM chloride in one syringe, allowing for simplified administration.
For the 12 months ending May 2018, the diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine sulfate tablet market had US sales of approximately USD64m, according to IQVIA.
The diagnosis of OPP solely depended upon: (1) evidence or history of exposure to OPCs within the previous twenty-four hours; (2) the odor of OPCs in the gastric contents; (3) distinctive signs of OPP, including meiosis, fasciculations and excessive salivation (4) improvement of the signs and symptoms of OPP after administration of high doses of atropine and/ or pralidoxime.
On arrival at the receiving hospital, 2 hours after initiating medical resuscitation, he was assessed as being severely ill, with an HR of 97 bpm, blood pressure of 153/70 mmHg, pinpoint pupils, some oral secretions, severe bilateral crepitations and an oxygen saturation level of 62%, despite an ongoing atropine infusion.
At the end of the 60 minutes of defocus on day 1, all experimental eyes were treated with one drop of 0.5% atropine. On day 2 (i.e., 22 hours after instillation of atropine), the experimental eye again received 2.00D of hyperopic retinal defocus for 60 minutes, and the fellow (control) eye was fully corrected.
Finally, the time matched acetylcholine (100 [micro]M)-induced amplitude of contractions before and after exposure to atropine (10 [micro]M) of Hirschsprung's disease (H) were statistically compared with their corresponding values of non-Hirschsprung's cases (before values of H were compared with before values of NH and after values of H were compared with after values of NH).
Solutions of dipyrone (that were protected from light) and atropine sulfate (both from Sigma, USA) and regular swine insulin (Neosulin-Biobras, Brazil) were prepared at the time of use in sterile saline.
The subcutaneous injection of atropine sulfate on each day of the oestrous cycle blocked the preovulatory surge of LH on the proestrous day, without apparent changes in preovulatory FSH levels [8].
Despite treatment with 0.5 mg of intravenous atropine, the patient remained at sinus bradycardia, with an HR of 36 beats per minute and BP of 96/37 mmHg.
In clinical practice, atropine, a nonselective muscarinic receptor blocker, is employed to prevent the parasympathomimetic effects induced by neostigmine when the anticholinesterase agent is clinically used to reverse the blockage of neuromuscular transmission caused by non-depolarizing muscular relaxants (Barrio, Miguel, Garcia, & Pelegrin, 2007).