atrophic cervicitis

atrophic cervicitis

Non-infectious inflammation of the uterine cervix due to a reduction of oestrogen; it is most commonly associated with menopause and hysterectomy, and may occur after radiotherapy.

Clinical findings
Increased infections and inflammation.
 
Cytology
Numerous neutrophils, mucus strands, parabasal with degenerative changes including nuclear pyknosis and karyorrhexis, and polychromatic staining of the cytoplasm.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pyometra is related to a general etiology of benign or malignant gynecologic tumors, radiation cervicitis, atrophic cervicitis, congenital anomalies, intrauterine devices, and traumatic damage to the cervix (7).
However, cytologists commonly use the term atrophic vaginitis for cervical Pap tests (as opposed to the more correct term, atrophic cervicitis), and it is applied to both cervical and vaginal Pap tests.
Pyometra, a collection of pus in the uterine cavity, is rare, with a reported incidence of 0.5% in gynecologic patients, including those with cancer.(5) The etiology of pyometra is varied, as it is associated with any condition causing cervical occlusion.(6)(7) The most common cause is malignancy of the uterus and true pelvis; other causes include benign tumors of the pelvis (leiomyomata, polyps), traumatic operations on the cervix (conization), radiation cervicitis, atrophic cervicitis, congenital anomalies, and puerperal infection.(6)(7) The typical symptoms of pyometra include uterine enlargement, cramping, vaginal discharge, acute abdominal pain, and postmentopausal bleeding.(8) Spontaneous rupture of a pyometra is an uncommon complication.(8)(9)(10)(11)