atrophia


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atrophy

 [at´ro-fe]
1. decrease in size of a normally developed organ or tissue; see also wasting.
2. to undergo or cause such a decrease. adj., adj atroph´ic.
acute yellow atrophy massive hepatic necrosis.
circumscribed cerebral atrophy pick's disease.
disuse atrophy atrophy of a tissue or organ as a result of inactivity or diminished function.
gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina a rare hereditary, slowly progressive atrophy of the choroid and pigment epithelium of the retina; inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.
juvenile spinal muscular atrophy Kugelberg-Welander syndrome.
Leber's optic atrophy Leber's optic neuropathy.
lobar atrophy pick's disease.
myelopathic muscular atrophy muscular atrophy due to lesion of the spinal cord, as in spinal muscular atrophy.
olivopontocerebellar atrophy any of a group of progressive hereditary disorders involving degeneration of the cerebellar cortex, middle peduncles, ventral pontine surface, and olivary nuclei. They occur in the young to middle-aged and are characterized by ataxia, dysarthria, and tremors similar to those of parkinsonism.
peroneal atrophy (peroneal muscular atrophy) progressive neuromuscular atrophy.
progressive neuromuscular atrophy hereditary muscular atrophy beginning in the muscles supplied by the fibular (peroneal) nerves, progressing slowly to involve the muscles of the hands and arms. Called also peroneal or peroneal muscular atrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
senile atrophy the natural atrophy of tissues and organs occurring with advancing age.
spinal muscular atrophy progressive degeneration of the motor cells of the spinal cord, beginning usually in the small muscles of the hands, but in some cases (scapulohumeral type) in the upper arm and shoulder muscles, and progressing slowly to the leg muscles. Called also Aran-Duchenne disease, Cruveilhier's disease, and Duchenne's disease.
subacute yellow atrophy submassive necrosis of the liver associated with broad zones of necrosis, due to viral, toxic, or drug-induced hepatitis; it may have an acute course with death from liver failure occurring after several weeks, or clinical recovery may be associated with regeneration of the parenchymal cells.

at·ro·phy

(at'rō-fē),
A wasting of tissues, organs, or the entire body, as from death and reabsorption of cells, diminished cellular proliferation, decreased cellular volume, pressure, ischemia, malnutrition, lessened function, or hormonal changes.
Synonym(s): atrophia
[G. atrophia, fr. a- priv. + trophē, nourishment]

at·ro·phy

(at'rŏ-fē)
A wasting of tissues, organs, or the entire body, as from death and reabsorption of cells, diminished cellular proliferation, decreased cellular volume, pressure, ischemia, malnutrition, lessened function, or hormonal changes.
Synonym(s): atrophia.
[G. atrophia, fr. a- priv. + trophē, nourishment]
References in periodicals archive ?
Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis was initially described in 1918 as an entity in which both linear and punctate scars appeared spontaneously on normal facial skin.1 Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare condition with approximately 20 reports in the literature.2,3
(32.) James Maxwell, "Pathological Inquiry into the Nature of Cachexia Africana," Jamaica Physicians' Journal 2 (1835): 413; Imray, "Observations" 307; Mason, "On Atrophia a Ventriculo" 290.
This drug had negative effects in sexuality and self-confidence of women, probably due to weight increase and vaginal atrophia. (19)
These mechanisms of apoptosis mediated by inducing factors under genetic control play a role in morphogenetic processes of various other species, (8) shown as being involved in the modeling of the shape of several territories -as sculpture of the limb zone, interdigital tissue, posterior zone of the wing bud, Mullerian ducts atrophia and mesoblast regression in mandibular remodeling.
This type of atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis, which is more frequently referred to as anetoderma or drug-induced pseudoporphyria, can occur in patients taking other NSAIDs but the incidence appears to be highest in those taking naproxen.
14 Schwartz J, editor Atrophia idiopathica mucosa oris.