defect

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defect

 [de´fekt]
an imperfection, failure, or absence.
congenital heart defect see congenital heart defect.
aortic septal defect see aortic septal defect.
atrial septal defect see atrial septal defect.
filling defect an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of stomach or intestine revealed by radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ.
neural tube defect see neural tube defect.
septal defect a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. Common types are aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect. See also congenital heart defect.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·fect

(dē'fekt), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

defect

Medtalk A malformation or abnormality. See Acquired platelet function defect, Atrial septal defect, Atrioventricular conduction defect, Birth defect, Developmental field defect, Enzyme defect, Epigenetic defect, Fibrous cortical defect, Filling defect, Homonymous field defect, Mass defect, Neural tube defect, Slot defect, Ventricular septal defect.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, anomaly, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; a qualitative departure from what is expected. usage note Often confused with deficiency, which is a quantitative shortcoming.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about defect

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. why does ADHD make kind of an hype to children? is it a nerve defect?

A. it's a complex interaction among genetic and environmental factors causing a disorder in the central nervous system. a study showed a delay in development of certain brain structures n the frontal cortex and temporal lobe, which are believed to be responsible for the ability to control and focus thinking.

More discussions about defect
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References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Atrial septal defect, Device closure, Occluder device.
A rare clinical entity, Lutembacher's syndrome is a combination of mitral stenosis and atrial septal defect. Both of these cardiac defects can be either congenital or acquired.
He said that most often an atrial septal defect is diagnosed when a physician hears a heart murmur during a physical examination.
"Crochetage" (notch) on R wave in inferior limb leads: a new independent electrocardiographic sign of atrial septal defect. J Am Coll Cardiol.
Bakhoum et al., "Feasibility of percutaneous closure of atrial septal defects in adults under transthoracic echocardiography guidance using the Figulla atrial septal defect occluder device," Journal of the Saudi Heart Association, vol.
We have done this as a prospective observational study by collecting data from 70 consecutive patients admitted for surgical closure of Atrial Septal Defect (ASD).
The associations between maternal gestational exposure to [PM.sub.10] and atrial septal defect, fetal patent ductus arteriosus, and overall congenital heart malformations provide further evidence that prenatal exposure to air pollution is associated with risks for fetal heart malformations.
Abbreviations SSS --sick sinus syndrome SND --sinus node dysfunction ASD --atrial septal defect ECG --electrocardiogram DDDR --dual chamber rate adaptive pacemaker CHD --congenital heart disease SVASD --sinus venosus atrial septal defect https://doi.org/10.2298/MPNS1706167D
Salim et al., "Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients with atrial septal defect: long-term follow-up results" Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology, vol.
Ackerman et al., "Electrocardiographic changes and arrhythmias following percutaneous atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale device closure," Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, vol.
KEY WORDS: Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC), Superior vena cava (SVC), Atrial septal defect (ASD), Intra cardiac baffle.
Objective: The annual rate of percutaneous transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects (ASDs) and patent foramen ovales (PFO) has markedly increased in the United States over the past decade.