atrial flutter


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Related to atrial flutter: atrial fibrillation

flutter

 [flut´er]
a rapid vibration or pulsation.
atrial flutter a cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (230–380 per minute), but regular. Two types, I and II, are distinguished according to rate; Type I is also more amenable to cardioversion. In Type I the atrial rate is usually 290 to 310 per minute but can range from 230 to 350. In Type II the atrial rate is usually 360 to 380 per minute but can range from 340 to 430.
diaphragmatic flutter peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause.
impure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is irregular.
mediastinal flutter see mediastinal flutter.
pure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is regular.
ventricular flutter a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, and virtually regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.

a·tri·al flut·ter

, auricular flutter
rapid regular atrial contractions occurring usually at rates between 250 and 330 per minute (Type I atrial flutter) and often producing "sawtooth" waves in the electrocardiogram, particularly leads II, III, and aVF. Type II atrial flutter is at rates of 330-450 per minute. Unlike Type I, it cannot be terminated by overdrive pacing.

atrial flutter

n.
Rapid regular atrial contractions usually occurring at rates between 250 and 350 per minute and often producing saw-tooth waves in an electrocardiogram.

atrial flutter

Cardiology Rapid, well organized contraction of the atrium at a rate of 250-350 beats/min; at atrial beats < 200/min, the ventricles can respond in a 1:1 fashion–at higher atrial rates, they respond with a 2:1, 3:1, or 4:1 block EKG Sawtooth waves and evidence of continued electric activity, best seen in II, III, aVf or V1 Etiology Paroxysmal AF may occur in normal hearts; chronic–persistent AF is often associated with underlying heart disease–eg, rheumatic or ischemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy, or PTE, mitral or tricuspid stenosis or regurgitation, thyrotoxicosis, alcoholism, pericarditis Clinical Asymptomatic, flutter in jugular venous pulse Management Synchronous DC–direct current cardioversion at low energy–.
< 50 joules; CCBs–eg, verapamil and diltiazem

a·tri·al flut·ter

, auricular flutter (ā'trē-ăl flŭt'ĕr, awr-ik'yū-lăr flŭt'ĕr)
Rapid regular atrial contractions occurring usually at rates between 250 and 350 per minute and often producing "saw-tooth" waves in the electrocardiogram, particularly leads II, III, and aVF.

atrial flutter

An abnormality of heart rhythm affecting the upper chambers of the heart which beat at an abnormally rapid rate of between 240 and 400 per minute. It is believed to be a form of oscillation caused by a feed-back loop of impulses within the heart muscle and independently of the natural pace-maker - the sino-atrial node. These impulses are transmitted to the lower chambers and the result is a grossly irregular pulse with a heart rate of 60 to 180 beats per minute.

Atrial flutter

A rapid pulsation of the upper chamber of the heart that interferes with normal function.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our case demonstrates RF ablation of CTI is a safe and effective therapeutic modality of drug refractory atrial flutters in patients with Senning operation.
Other Treatment Approaches Afib and atrial flutter that don't respond to drugs may be treated with a procedure called cardioversion, in which the abnormal rhythm is reset using a mild electrical shock delivered via paddles or electrode patches placed on your chest.
Birkholz and coworkers suggested that "in a dynamic magnetic field, rapidly switched magnetic gradients can induce electrical interference in monitoring leads" and that "artifacts may vary in their frequency, and time of occurrence, even mimicking atrial flutter, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation" (2).
Muscle tremors may appear as rapid variations in the baseline that may be either coarse or fine and mimic atrial flutter or a runaway pacemaker.
Atrial flutter. Atrial flutter occurs because of an ectopic atrial focus or a re-entry phenomenon.
Eleven patients were studied for ventricular tachycardia, three were studied for atrial flutter, and two were studied for conduction and sinus node function study.
Eighty-six had atrial fibrillation and 42 had atrial flutter. An acute underlying cause for the onset of atrial fibrillation was identified in 13 patients -- myocardial infarction in eight, recent surgery in three and pulmonary embolism in two.
Atrial flutter. Rapidly fired signals cause the muscles in the atria to contract quickly, leading to a very fast, steady heartbeat.
Radio frequency ablation catheters and connecting cables: 7 f, for ablative treatment of atrial flutter, irrigation (external cooling) max.
An electrocardiogram showed that her initial rhythm was atypical atrial flutter with an excessively wide QRS complex of 280 milliseconds, and QRS morphology (lead aVR) was suggestive of potential flecainide toxicity (Figure 1a).
Among SVT common arrhythmias were atrial tachycardia (AT) 50 (17.5%) and atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia (AVNRT) 38 (13.2%), while Atrioventricular re-entry tachycardia (AVRT) and atrial flutter (AFL) were less common found in 30 (10.4%) and 8 (2.8%) cases, respectively, as shown in table-I.

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