atopy


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atopy

 [at´o-pe]
a clinical hypersensitivity state or allergy with a hereditary predisposition; the tendency to develop an allergy is inherited, although the specific clinical form (such as hay fever or asthma) is not. The antibody reagin is involved. Called also atopic, hereditary, or spontaneous allergy.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·o·py

(at'ō-pē),
A genetically determined state of hypersensitivity to environmental allergens. Type I allergic reaction is associated with the IgE antibody and a group of diseases, principally asthma, hay fever, and atopic dermatitis.
[G. atopia, strangeness, fr. a- priv. + topos, a place]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

atopy

A state of increased sensitivity to common antigens (e.g., house dust, animal dander, pollen) with increased production of allergen-specific IgE. Atopy may have a hereditary component, given the increased susceptibility to hay fever, asthma and eczematoid dermatitis.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

atopy

Clinical immunology A state of ↑ sensitivity to common antigens–eg, house dust, animal dander, pollen, with ↑ production of allergen-specific IgE; atopy may have a hereditary component as there is ↑ susceptibility to hay fever, asthma, and eczematoid dermatitis. See Asthma, Atopic dermatitis, Hay fever.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

at·o·py

(at'ŏ-pē)
A genetically determined state of hypersensitivity to environmental allergens. Type I allergic reaction is associated with the IgE antibody and a group of diseases, principally asthma, hay fever, and atopic dermatitis.
[G. atopia, strangeness, fr. a- priv. + topos, a place]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

atopy

A state giving rise to an allergy in which the reaction occurs at a different site from that of contact with the causal ALLERGEN. Atopy is an immediate hypersensitivity reaction associated with IMMUNOGLOBULIN E (IgE) and is a maternally transmitted genetic disorder due to mutations in a gene on chromosome 11. This gene codes for the IgE receptor on MAST CELLS. Atopy causes a proneness to ASTHMA, HAY FEVER and ECZEMA (atopic DERMATITIS). The term is derived from the Greek a , not and topos , a place.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Atopy

A state that makes persons more likely to develop allergic reactions of any type, including the inflammation and airway narrowing typical of asthma.
Mentioned in: Asthma
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·o·py

(at'ŏ-pē)
A genetically determined state of hypersensitivity to environmental allergens.
[G. atopia, strangeness, fr. a- priv. + topos, a place]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Atopy is less common in India as compared to the western countries.
Evidence for the transmissibility of atopy: hypothesis.
Six patients did not remember their age at surgery Further; 66.2% patients mentioned a history of atopy. The distribution of allergic diseases of patients with adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy is presented in Table 2.
One study revealed that prevalence of asthma and atopy were 25.5% and 56% respectively in Korean population.
Thus, it is important to specify allergens in different regions that cause sensitization in patients with atopy. Therefore, measures can be taken to reduce the morbidity of allergic diseases, and it may be possible to prevent or delay development of disease in sensitized individuals.
Skin prick test was performed to provide an objective measure of atopy, defined as skin reactivity to one or more allergens.
Self-report * Atopy Challenge test (+) CSU 66,9% 17,5% 1,2% Control 24,4% 16,5% 0,7% Note: Table made from bar graph.
reported PsA to be significantly less likely to be associated with atopy than isolated skin psoriasis [11].
The European Respiratory Society Study on COPD (EUROSCOP) found that 18% of the COPD participants were atopic by measuring specific IgE,[sup][5] and a further study demonstrated that atopy was associated with a higher prevalence of cough and phlegm, but not with FEV[sub]1 decline or lung function.[sup][6] Thereafter, the study of Bafadhel et al .
In the follow-up visit at the age of 3-7 years after discharge, it was learned that 46.8% of the subjects received treatment with diagnoses of asthma and non-asthmatic atopy (allergic rhinitis, eczema).
The presented study is so far the first report focusing on the role of YKL40 protein in skin atopy. However, the recent research has found the evidence of YKL-40 contribution to the mechanisms of type 2 allergic response and its association with atopy.
[14] Finally, a review published on 2008 stated that, although the research fails to support the benefits of breastfeeding in ADs and that breastfed infants showed a higher incidence of atopy and asthma, prolonged breastfeeding would eventually reduce this.