atomism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to atomism: logical atomism

at·om·ism

(at'ŏm-izm),
The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis of the elementary parts of which it is assumed to be composed. Compare: holism.

atomism

A term of uncertain utility for the analysis of the individual components of psychological phenomena.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Fisher (philosophy, American Council of Learned Societies) focuses on the epistemological and scientific element of Gassendi's thought, and on the relations between his empiricism and atomism, knowing full well the latter two may have great difficulties fitting together, but going through Gassendi's innovations in combining the thought of the past into a coherent pathway into reconciliation of the two ideas.
Before the rise of chemistry in recognizably modern form at the start of the nineteenth century, atomism was not really a part of empirical science; its explanations were alternate to, but no better than, those based on other approaches to the constitution of matter.
Landini applies this rereading of Russell to Wittgenstein, arguing that the Tractatus is really about how to extend and perfect logical atomism (Russell's eliminativistic program for a scientific philosophy based on an analysis of logical form).
A dialectical reflection on Crowe's arguments reveals that their ambiguity arises from Crowe's implicit adoption of a form of cognitional atomism.
Using these, she documents in detail their fascination not only with Lucretius' atomism, but also with his denial of providence and creation, his fierce repudiation of religion and the afterlife, and his analysis of the accidental emergence and evolution of human society.
Atomism, Pluralism, and Conceptual Content, DANIEL A.
In a critical review of early (Tocco and Lasswitz) and recent studies, she argues (1) that Bruno's "atomism in mathematics" has been misunderstood; (2) that no attention is paid to the crucial role of his doctrine of God in his epistemology; and (3) that the historical position of Bruno has not yet been accounted for.
Take for instance Democritus' atomism and Hegel's holism.
Hobbes influenced the Scientific Revolution with his mechanical atomism and nominalism ([1651] 1964, 16 and chaps.
In short, Arthur argues that Leibniz's monadic metaphysics were more influenced by seventeenth-century atomism than previously thought, and that Leibniz infers the reality of monads from the reality of matter.
As Goldstein frames it, Lucretian atomism, far from simply being a vulgar materialism or naive empiricism, pictured matter itself as being figural in nature.
Since the rise of atomism in the seventeenth century the substance view has dominated scientifically grounded philosophy.