atomic theory


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a·tom·ic the·o·ry

that chemical compounds are formed by the union of atoms in certain definite proportions; in its modern form, first advanced in 1803 by John Dalton.

atomic theory

Etymology: Gk, atmos, indivisible, theoria, speculation
the concept that all matter is composed of submicroscopic atoms that are in turn composed of protons, electrons, and neutrons. A chemical element is identified by the number of protons in its atoms.

atomic theory

1. The theory that all matter is composed of atoms.
2. Theories pert. to the structure, properties, and behavior of the atom.
See also: theory
References in periodicals archive ?
Atomic Theory II: Ions, Isotopes and Electron Shells, Visionlearning Vol.
His monumental contribution to physics, his fundamental contributions to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics, rested upon the presumption of the atomic theory of matter and on a Newtonian, mechanistic account of molecular dynamics.
How can he be so sure that atoms are altogether safe, if atomic theory can be replaced by another quite different theory?
His scientific speculations were based on Democritus' atomic theory and Epicurus' interpretation of it.
Comprised of 19 chapters, the book will address ideal gas laws, real gases, the thermodynamics of simple systems, thermochemistry, entropy and the second law, the Gibbs free energy, equilibrium, statistical approaches to thermodynamics, the phase rule, chemical kinetics, liquids and solids, solution chemistry, conductivity, electrochemical cells, atomic theory, wave mechanics of simple systems, molecular orbital theory, experimental determination of molecular structure, and photochemistry and the theory of chemical kinetics.
The text begins with five chapters on the basic mathematics and language of chemistry, chemical properties, and the history and language of basic atomic theory.
Sorabji then takes up Zeno's paradoxes and the atomic theory of time.
Topics covered in the 35 illustrated chapters include: standards for measurement, properties of matter, early atomic theory and structure, chemical equations, solutions, chemical equilibrium, nuclear and organic chemistry, polymers, aldehydes and ketones, stereoisomerism, carbohydrates, enzymes, nutrition, bioenergetics, and metabolism.
In 1957 at Princeton University, Hugh Everett III proposed a radical way of dealing with some of the more perplexing aspects of atomic theory.
In 1957 at Princeton University, Hugh Everett III proposed a radical new way of dealing with some of the more perplexing aspects of atomic theory.
Similarly, physicists and paleontologists were developing new insights into atomic theory that would yield better ways of dating bones and artifacts, such as the carbon-14 radioactive dating method.
Essays of no more than three pages succinctly provide historical background, as well as descriptive text, about ideas ranging from atomic theory to Zeno's paradox, More mundane, yet still provocative, topics are included, such as how airplanes fly and how polarized sunglasses work.