atomic theory


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a·tom·ic the·o·ry

that chemical compounds are formed by the union of atoms in certain definite proportions; in its modern form, first advanced in 1803 by John Dalton.

atomic theory

Etymology: Gk, atmos, indivisible, theoria, speculation
the concept that all matter is composed of submicroscopic atoms that are in turn composed of protons, electrons, and neutrons. A chemical element is identified by the number of protons in its atoms.

atomic theory

1. The theory that all matter is composed of atoms.
2. Theories pert. to the structure, properties, and behavior of the atom.
See also: theory
References in periodicals archive ?
Atomic Theory I: The Early Days, Visionlearning Vol.
Sorabji then takes up Zeno's paradoxes and the atomic theory of time.
Topics covered in the 35 illustrated chapters include: standards for measurement, properties of matter, early atomic theory and structure, chemical equations, solutions, chemical equilibrium, nuclear and organic chemistry, polymers, aldehydes and ketones, stereoisomerism, carbohydrates, enzymes, nutrition, bioenergetics, and metabolism.
In 1957 at Princeton University, Hugh Everett III proposed a radical way of dealing with some of the more perplexing aspects of atomic theory.
In 1957 at Princeton University, Hugh Everett III proposed a radical new way of dealing with some of the more perplexing aspects of atomic theory.
Essays of no more than three pages succinctly provide historical background, as well as descriptive text, about ideas ranging from atomic theory to Zeno's paradox, More mundane, yet still provocative, topics are included, such as how airplanes fly and how polarized sunglasses work.
Although everyone "knows" that science must be publicly funded, everyone also knows that nearly all the great leaps of classical science - Newtonian physics, relativity, atomic theory, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, genetics, and many others - occurred with no government aid whatever.
Lucretius, after all, writing in the first century BCE, used the epic meter for De Rerum Natura, six books of atomic theory and Epicurean philosophy.
Robertson begins with a review of fundamental topics such as the periodic table, atomic theory, and chemical reactions.