atmosphere


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atmosphere

 [at´mos-fēr]
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place. adj., atmospher´ic.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr),
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr)
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

the gaseous envelope surrounding a particular body such as the earth, or the gaseous content of a given structure or container.

Atmosphere

A measurement of pressure. One atmosphere equals the pressure of air at sea level (14.7 pounds per square inch [psi]).
References in periodicals archive ?
But three quartz clocks will continue to operate, set to power up the detectors 45 minutes before Huygens reaches the top of Titan's extended atmosphere. The moon's atmosphere reaches to a height of 600 kilometers, or 10 times the height of Earth's.
Moral atmosphere is described as a shared culture or mutual understanding of what is an appropriate or inappropriate behavior based upon the interactions among group members (Power, Higgins, and Kohlberg, 1989).
The team has used the information learned from the Titan flybys to better prepare for flying low in Saturn's atmosphere.
our life has, in the astronomical sense of the word, an atmosphere: it is constantly enshrouded by those mists we call the sensible world or history, the one of the corporeal life and the one of the human life, the present and the past, as a pell-mell ensemble of bodies and minds, promiscuity of visages, words, actions, with, between them all, that cohesion which cannot be denied them since they are all differences, extreme divergencies of one same something (Merleau-Ponty, 1968: 84).
Before TIMED was launched in 2001, "the only measurements of carbon dioxide in the upper atmosphere were direct measurements from sounding rocket research flights and short-lived spaceborne sensors," explains Jia Yue of Hampton University, the lead author of a recent article in Geophysical Research Letters that detailed the new findings.
They're therefore able to drill deep into the Martian atmosphere, sailing unencumbered until the atmosphere grows denser and there's more stuff to run into.
Heavy isotopes of carbon and oxygen are both enriched in today's thin Martian atmosphere compared with the proportions in the raw material that formed Mars, as deduced from proportions in the Sun and other parts of the solar system.
Since 1970, the average density of the atmosphere at an altitude of 400 kilometers has decreased about 1.7 percent per decade.
These disease causing elements can be transmitted by external environmental moistures and internal body fluids, since it is the open atmosphere moisture and body fluids that transport the infecting agent.
Our atmosphere is composed almost totally of nitrogen and oxygen.
A rocket will boost Neptune 297 km (185 mi) into Earth's atmosphere, or the protective layer of gases surrounding a planetary body (see Nuts & Bolts, p.