athletic training


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athletic training

The practice of physical conditioning and reconditioning of athletes and prevention of injuries incurred by them.

athletic training

Sports medicine The practice of physical conditioning and reconditioning of athletes and prevention of injuries incurred by athletes. See Athlete, Athletic trainer.

ath·le·tic train·ing

(ath-let'ik trān'ing)
Provision of comprehensive health care services to athletes, including preventive preparation, evaluation of illnesses and injuries, first aid and emergency care, rehabilitation, and other related services.

athletic training

1. The physical and mental conditioning program used by athletes to increase their proficiency in sports.
2. Performing the tasks that an athletic trainer is prepared to do. Athletic training is practiced by athletic trainers, health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. Athletic training encompasses the prevention, diagnosis, and intervention of emergency, acute, and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations, and disabilities.
See: athletic trainer
See also: training
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessment: The authors of this book are highly knowledgeable professions in the field of athletic training with vast experience.
Ins tructional assistants, wellness coordinators, conic aides, computer technical support, floating substitute teachers -- all of these positions can be filled by ar ATC during the first few years of the athletic training program.
Examples show the relevance of measurement and evaluation in professions including athletic training, fitness/wellness management, exercise and sport psychology, coaching, physical education, and physical therapy.
In addition to providing athletic training to the athletes, the ATC could teach and oversee student trainer programs, keep accurate records and documentation of injuries and their management, and develop better lines of communication between the schools and the medical community.
For athletic training practitioners (and practitioners-in-training) as well as health care or rehabilitation professionals, 11 contributions written by doctors, mental health professionals, and academics offer a practical understanding of cognitive and psychosocial issues among athletes, as well as discussion of how to intervene and when to refer.
The text is for students in coaching, athletic training, and K-12 physical education.
Six of the chapters have been written by other authors, who work in sports medicine, orthopedic surgery, and athletic training.