athlete's heart


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ath·lete's heart

a loose designation for cardiac findings in healthy athletes that would be or could be abnormal in patients with disease, including atrioventricular blocks, left ventricular hypertrophy and, sometimes, benign arrhythmias and atrioventricular blocks.

athlete's heart

Athletic heart syndrome Sports medicine A heart typical of trained athletes, and characterized by ↑ left ventricular diastolic volume and ↑ thickness of the left ventricular wall, as seen by 2-D echocardiography; arrhythmias seen in athletes' hearts are usually benign and include sinus bradycardia, wandering pacemaker, cardiac blocks, nodal rhythm, atrial fibrillation, ST segment and T-wave changes, ↑ P wave amplitude, right ventricular hypertrophy. See Sudden unexplained nocturnal death.

ath·lete's heart

(ath'lēts hahrt)
Nonpathologic enlarged heart in athletes reflecting specific adaptation to prolonged training. Manifestations in response to resistance training are thickened left ventricular wall and concentric hypertrophy, and in response to endurance training include enlarged left ventricular cavity and eccentric hypertrophy.
See: hypertrophy
References in periodicals archive ?
Griffet V9 et al in their workup of Athlete's heart in the young, while recording the ECG and echocardiographic patterns in 107 French athletes and hence concluded Adolescent athlete's heart is normal.
Athlete's heart: the potential for multimodality imaging to address the critical remaining
The athlete's heart: a Meta Analysis of cardiac structure and function.
Caption: Figure 3: Clinical criteria used to help differentiate athlete's heart from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in individuals with borderline abnormalities.
Roughly 40% of highly trained individuals have abnormal ECG patterns that are labeled athlete's heart, and this condition is not restricted to the elite athlete category, said Dr.
Immediately after and 1 minute after the end of the test, the athlete's heart rate is verified.
(2000) The athlete's heart: A meta-analysis of cardiac structure and function.
For some reason, the overtrained athlete's heart response to running is dampened.
Cardiac Risk Among Athletes: an Italian study suggests that some electrocardiogram abnormalities commonly considered to be innocent manifestations of "athlete's heart" may foretell life-threatening trouble.
This condition, known as "athlete's heart," is mainly due to an increase in the cardiac cavity size and some increases in the left ventricular thickness.