athlete's heart


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ath·lete's heart

a loose designation for cardiac findings in healthy athletes that would be or could be abnormal in patients with disease, including atrioventricular blocks, left ventricular hypertrophy and, sometimes, benign arrhythmias and atrioventricular blocks.

athlete's heart

[ath′lēts]
an enlarged but otherwise normal heart of an athlete trained for endurance. It is characterized by a low heart rate, an increased pumping capacity, and a greater ability to deliver oxygen to skeletal muscles. It may sometimes be confused with left ventricular hypertrophy. Also called athletic heart syndrome (AHS).

athlete's heart

Athletic heart syndrome Sports medicine A heart typical of trained athletes, and characterized by ↑ left ventricular diastolic volume and ↑ thickness of the left ventricular wall, as seen by 2-D echocardiography; arrhythmias seen in athletes' hearts are usually benign and include sinus bradycardia, wandering pacemaker, cardiac blocks, nodal rhythm, atrial fibrillation, ST segment and T-wave changes, ↑ P wave amplitude, right ventricular hypertrophy. See Sudden unexplained nocturnal death.

ath·lete's heart

(ath'lēts hahrt)
Nonpathologic enlarged heart in athletes reflecting specific adaptation to prolonged training. Manifestations in response to resistance training are thickened left ventricular wall and concentric hypertrophy, and in response to endurance training include enlarged left ventricular cavity and eccentric hypertrophy.
See: hypertrophy

athlete's heart

hypertrophy of the muscle of the left ventricle as a physiological response to training, especially endurance training. It is not considered to be pathological. Results in slowing of heart rate and changes characteristic of hypertrophy in the electrocardiogram (ECG).
References in periodicals archive ?
athletes: relevance to differential diagnosis of athlete's heart and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Barbier J, Ville N, Kervio G, Walther G, Carre F, Sports-specific features of athlete's heart and their relation to echo-cardiographic parameters.
The athlete's heart syndrome is identified as all of the structural, electrical and functional changes developed in the heart to help maintain cardiac output increase with regular physical activity (1-6).
It's tough to distinguish athlete's heart from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) when an athlete's left ventricular wall is thickened in a nondilated, normally contractile left ventricle with no systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, said Dr.
Since athletes can naturally have larger hearts, genetic testing can play an important role in distinguishing HCM heart from normal athlete's heart.
ECG also has a relatively low specificity as a screening test in athletic populations because of the high frequency of electrocardiographic alterations that are associated with normal physiological adaptations of an athlete's heart to training [24].
These basic steps can provide a good insight into the young athlete's heart condition.
1999) Sports-specific adaptations and differentiation of the athlete's heart.
Conversely, in athletes without cardiovascular abnormalities, reduction in frequency of ventricular tachyarrhythmias and the absence of cardiac events in the follow-up support the benign clinical nature of these rhythm disturbances as another expression of athlete's heart (13).
29) The physiologic changes in athlete's heart represent training adaptations and are not prognostic of disease.
Athlete's heart is considered a physiological phenomenon with no known harmful consequences.