atheromatous plaque


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Related to atheromatous plaque: atherosclerosis, aneurysm

plaque

 [plak]
1. any patch or flat area.
2. a superficial, solid, elevated skin lesion with a diameter equal to or greater than 1.0 cm (0.5 cm according to some authorities); see also papule.
atheromatous plaque fibrous plaque.
dental plaque a dense, nonmineralized, highly organized biofilm of microbes, organic and inorganic material derived from the saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and bacterial byproducts. It plays an important etiologic role in the development of dental caries and periodontal and gingival diseases; calcified plaque forms dental calculus.
fibrous plaque the lesion of atherosclerosis, a white to yellow area within the wall of an artery that causes the intimal surface to bulge into the lumen; it is composed of lipid, cell debris, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and, in older persons, calcium. Called also atheromatous plaque.
Hollenhorst p's atheromatous emboli containing cholesterol crystals in the retinal arterioles.
pleural p's opaque white plaques on the parietal pleura, visible radiographically in cases of asbestosis.
senile p's microscopic lesions composed of fragmented axon terminals and dendrites surrounding a core of amyloid seen in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

ath·er·om·a·tous plaque

a well-demarcated yellow area or swelling on the intimal surface of an artery; produced by intimal lipid deposit.

atheromatous plaque

a yellowish raised area on the lining of an artery formed by fatty deposits indicative of atherosclerosis.

plaque

1. any patch or flat area.
2. a clear area of cell lysis caused by viral replication on a cell monolayer.

amniotic plaque
small, 1 to 2 inch diameter, poxlike lesion on the inside of the amnion. Constant on the bovine amnion during the middle trimester and causes no problems.
annular plaque
seen in equine lupus erythematosus panniculitis.
plaque assay
a method of quantifying the number of infectious units by inoculating serial dilutions of a viral suspension on a cell culture monolayer, overlaying with a medium containing agarose and after several days incubation, counting the number of plaques formed; recorded as plaque forming units/ml.
atheromatous plaque
a deposit of predominantly fatty material in the lining of blood vessels occurring in atherosclerosis.
bacterial plaque, dental plaque
a mass adhering to the enamel surface of a tooth, composed of a mixed colony of bacteria in an intercellular matrix of bacterial and salivary polymers and remnants of epithelial cells and leukocytes. It may cause caries, dental calculi and periodontal disease.
cutaneous plaque
an elevated, solid structure without a necrotic center, up to 1 to 2 inch diameter with an unbroken surface.
drug plaque
cutaneous, subcutaneous or subconjunctival deposits formed as a result of injection of some drugs, particularly repository steroid preparations. May be unsightly and a cause of conjunctivitis.
ear plaque
see ear plaque.
eosinophilic plaque
see eosinophilic plaque.
plaque-forming cells
see plaque assay (above).
plaque-forming count
the number of plaques formed in the plaque assay.
senile plaque
described in the brain of old dogs.
siderotic plaque
nodules observed as dry, yellow encrustations on the splenic capsule of old dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another positive effect of EDTA for the treatment of atherosclerosis, CAD, CVD and CVA is its ability to reduce or eradicate stenosis due to atheromatous plaques.
The first few centimetres of these vessels are particularly susceptible to atheromatous plaque formation, resulting in cardiac muscle receiving insufficient oxygen to perform properly and thus the body does not receive a sufficient circulation.
Neopterin stimulates nuclear factor-kB translocation to the nucleus promoting the expression of proinflammatory genes, adhesion molecules, tissue factor, and other substances implicated in the inflammatory processes that take place within the arterial wall in atherogenesis and atheromatous plaque disruption.
No atheromatous plaques were present; no mural thrombi were noted.
There is a special class of SCAD, which develops on a preexisting atheromatous plaque (6).
All patients were subjected to CT scan brain and colour doppler study of extracranial carotid arteries, the systolic and diastolic velocity of blood flow, and the ratio of peak systolic velocities of common carotid arteries, carotid intimal medial thickness, presence of atheromatous plaque and thrombus were looked for and then the percentage of stenosis of the affected patients were assessed.
In type II variant spasm of coronary artery may result in atheromatous plaque disruption and thus manifests as an acute myocardial infarction.
The inflammatory process might encourage more extensive atheromatous plaque formation and hence larger infarct size than in nonarthritic individuals who develop acute MI, he said.
During allergic episodes, chemical agents such as histamine, leukotrienes, and neutral proteases are increased in the peripheral circulation, and hence, these agents may cause coronary artery spasm (CAS) and atheromatous plaque rupture.
Recent studies from our group suggest that neopterin may provide more comprehensive information regarding risk of cardiovascular events than do CRP measurements, particularly when macrophage activation is implicated, as seen in rapid CAD progression (5) and atheromatous plaque disruption (3).
MUNICH -- Nifedipine improves coronary endothelial function without significantly reducing atheromatous plaque size in patients with stable coronary artery disease, Dr Thomas Luscher said at the annual congress of the European Society of Cardiology.
Investigators noted a 34% reduction in levels of IL-6, a cytokine released from blood cells in response to inflammatory stimuli that is believed to be responsible for the induction of CRP production by the liver, and a 50% reduction in levels of MMP-9, an enzyme thought to cause destabilization of atheromatous plaque, leading to clot formation.