atheroembolism

ath·er·o·em·bo·lism

(ath'er-ō-em'bō-lizm),
Cholesterol embolism, with or without calcific matter, originating from an atheroma of the aorta or other diseased artery.

ath·er·o·em·bo·lism

(ath'ĕr-ō-em'bŏ-lizm)
Cholesterol embolism, with or without calcific matter, originating from an atheroma of the aorta or other diseased artery.
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Other cardiovascular conditions include heart failure, abdominal aortic aneurysm, atheroembolism (hospitalizations only), atherosclerosis and peripheral artery disease (deaths only), hypertension without heart failure, and cardiac arrest that had another Million Hearts-preventable event type coded as a secondary diagnosis or contributing cause of death.
KEYWORDS: Stroke, Coronary Artery Bypass, Atheroembolism, Off-pump, Aorta, Cardio-pulmonary bypass, Morbidity.
Posttransplant histology in 9 nonsurgical PNF showed acute rejection (humoral and cellular) in only 1 SK[T.sub.pre]; in all other cases it showed interstitial fibrosis, severe tubular damage and atrophy, and arteriosclerosis as main features, indicating poor organ quality; additional findings were patchy necrotic areas (one with atheroembolism) in 2 cases (1 SK[T.sub.pre] and 1 SK[T.sub.hr]), suggesting embolism from manipulated recipient vessels, and diabetic glomerulosclerosis (1 SK[T.sub.hr]) which had been missed in the preimplantation biopsy.
Pepper, "Changes in aortic rotational flow during cardiopulmonary bypass studied by transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance velocity imaging: a potential mechanism for atheroembolism during cardiopulmonary bypass," Heart and Vessels, vol.
Since catheter-based coronary artery angiography [51] is expensive and is associated with a small risk of serious complications that are directly related to its invasive nature and to the use of iodinated contrast media (such as atheroembolism, bleeding, myocardial infarction, ventricular tachyarrhythmias, renal failure, stroke, and death), noninvasive techniques, are usually preferred first and gaining great popularity.
This procedure is known to be challenging even in the nonemergent setting as the angioplasty is associated with a risk of dissection, perforation, acute thrombosis, atheroembolism, and other contrast related complications (anaphylaxis or contrast-induced renal dysfunction) [13].
This sometimes is referred to as atheroembolism, which can commonly occur from cardiovascular intervention including surgery or catheterization procedures.
Contrast aortography may be used for the evaluation of patients with aneurysms, but the procedure carries a small risk of complications, such as bleeding, allergic reactions, and atheroembolism. Since the presence of mural thrombi may reduce the luminal size, aortography may underestimate the diameter of an aneurysm.
* Other diagnoses to consider for non-healing or treatment-resistant ulcers include infection (eg, bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal, or underlying osteomyelitis), vasculopathy (arterial insufficiency, venous stasis, atheroembolism, or diabetes mellitus), pyoderma gangrenosum, and malnutrition.
Nonneoplastic Changes in Nephrectomy Specimens Removed for Renal Neoplasms * Changes Percentage Normal 10 Vascular changes with normal parenchyma 29 Vascular changes with parenchymal scarring 22 Diabetic nephropathy 23 Others 8 Atheroembolism 2 Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis 2.7 BCG-related granulomatous 0.9 interstitial nephritis IgA nephropathy 1.8 Collapsing glomerulopathy 1.8 End-stage renal disease 1.8 Thin glomerular basement membrane disease 1.8 Amyloidosis 0.9 Chronic thrombotic microangiopathy 4.6 Sickle cell nephropathy 0.4 Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 0.4 Hydronephrosis ([dagger]) * Data are taken from Bijol et al (1) and Henriksen et al.
The chronic effects of hypertension and type 2 diabetes on the renal vasculature lead to renal diseases involving nephroschlerosis, atherosclerosis, and atheroembolism (Gomez et al.