ate


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ate

(āt)
v.
Past tense of eat
References in periodicals archive ?
one step farther than if you ate nothing but Snickers bars, to be precise.
com), World Semiconductor ATE Markets, reveals that revenue in this market totaled $3.
Ruffles chips made with olestra - those who ate the olestra chips actually suffered less diarrhea, gas, abdominal pain and cramping than people who ate the regular potato chips.
In addition, much of what these children ate in the fruit and vegetable department was from fruit juice, which lacks one of the key components for fruits and vegetables, fiber.
In 1994, Harvard's Johanna Seddon reported that people who ate higher levels of lutein and zeaxanthin were 43 percent less likely than people who ate lower levels to develop macular degeneration--an irreversible deterioration of the retina.
In a 12-year study of more than 70,000 nurses, women who ate more whole grains weighed significantly less than did women who chose fewer whole grains.
The risk of prostate cancer was a third lower in men who ate tomato-based products more than ten times a week than in men who ate them less than twice a week," explains Giovannucci.
In one of the few that lasted more than a week, 13 women who were offered a narrow selection of low-fat foods ate fewer calories--and lost weight--at first.
When researchers tracked more than 34,000 women for 18 years, those who ate at least four servings of beans a week had a 33 percent lower risk of colon adenomas than those who ate beans no more than once a week.
They found that mice on the high-DHA diet had only about 30 percent as many deposits of a waxy protein called beta-amyloid--a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease--compared with mice that ate little or no DHA.
From September 2004 to January 2005, stool specimens of patients who ate raw fish were examined to determine the prevalence of diphyllobothriasis.