ataxia


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ataxia

 [ah-tak´se-ah]
failure of muscular coordination; irregularity of muscular action. adj., adj atac´tic, atax´ic.
cerebellar ataxia ataxia due to disease of the cerebellum.
Friedreich's ataxia see friedreich's ataxia.
frontal ataxia disturbance of equilibrium associated with tumor of the frontal lobe.
hereditary ataxia Friedreich's ataxia.
hysterical ataxia ataxia recognizable as a conversion symptom; see also astasia-abasia.
locomotor ataxia tabes dorsalis.
sensory ataxia ataxia due to loss of proprioception (joint position sense), resulting in poorly judged movements and becoming aggravated when the eyes are closed.
ataxia-telangiectasia a severe, autosomal recessive, progressive ataxia, associated with telangiectasias (dilation of small blood vessels) in the skin and eyes; immunodeficiency with frequent infections of the respiratory tract from sinuses to lungs; and abnormal eye movements. Called also Louis-Bar's syndrome.

a·tax·i·a

(ă-tak'sē-ă),
An inability to coordinate muscle activity during voluntary movement; most often results from disorders of the cerebellum or the posterior columns of the spinal cord; may involve the limbs, head, or trunk.
Synonym(s): ataxy, incoordination
[G. a-prov. + taxis, order]

ataxia

/atax·ia/ (ah-tak´se-ah) failure of muscular coordination; irregularity of muscular action.atac´ticatax´ic
Bruns' frontal ataxia  a disturbance of equilibrium and gait due to a lesion in the frontal lobe, characterized by assumption of a broad-based gait with the feet flat on the ground and a tendency to retropulsion.
Friedreich's ataxia  hereditary sclerosis of the dorsal and lateral columns of the spine, usually beginning in childhood or youth; it is attended with ataxia, speech impairment, scoliosis, peculiar movements, paralysis, and often hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
locomotor ataxia  tabes dorsalis.
motor ataxia  inability to control the coordinate movements of the muscles.
sensory ataxia  ataxia due to loss of proprioception (joint position sensation) between the motor cortex and peripheral nerves, resulting in poorly judged movements, the incoordination becoming aggravated when the eyes are closed.
ataxia-telangiectasia  a severe autosomal recessive progressive cerebellar ataxia, associated with oculocutaneous telangiectasia, abnormal eye movements, sinopulmonary disease, and immunodeficiency.

ataxia

(ə-tăk′sē-ə)
n.
1. Loss of the ability to coordinate muscular movement.
2. Any of various degenerative, often hereditary, disorders that are characterized by ataxia and are frequently associated with cerebellar atrophy.

a·tax′ic adj. & n.

ataxia

[ətak′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, without order
an impaired ability to coordinate movement, often characterized by a staggering gait and postural imbalance. It can have many causes, including lesions in the spinal cord or cerebellum that may be the sequelae of birth trauma, congenital disorder, infection, degenerative disorder, neoplasm, toxic substance stroke, or head injury. See also hereditary ataxia. ataxial, ataxic, adj.

ataxia

Neurology
Partial or complete loss of co-ordination of voluntary muscular movement; muscle incoordination and gait unsteadiness due to cerebellar dysfunction, and compromised regulation of limb movement.

DiffDx
Hereditary (AD, AR, X-linked, DNA repair defects, metabolic disorders, mitochondrial disease, multisystem disorders, immune defects, Miller-Fisher syndrome), multiple sclerosis, paraneoplastic, infections (CNS, acute ataxia, viral, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, meningitis mass lesion), abscess, neoplasm, sarcoid, paroxysmal, epilepsy, febrile, migraine, polyneuropathy, anti-MAG Syndrome, GALOP Syndrome, sensory neuronopathy, large fibre, supratentorial, gait disorders, elderly, extrapyramidal, hydrocephalus systemic, amyloid, autoimmune, endocrine (hypoparathyroid, thyroid), GI disorders (coeliac disease, sprue, vitamin E malabsorption, Whipple's disease), toxins and drugs, trauma, vascular, vestibular.

ataxia

Neurology Muscle incoordination and gait unsteadiness due to cerebellar dysfunction, and compromise in regulating limb movement. See Cerebellar gait, Friedreich's ataxia, Hereditary cerebellar ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia Vox populi Wobbling.

a·tax·i·a

(ă-taksē-ă)
An inability to coordinate muscle activity, causing jerkiness, and inefficiency of voluntary movement. Often due to disorders of the cerebellum or the posterior columns of the spinal cord; may involve limbs, head, or trunk.
Synonym(s): incoordination.
[G. a-prov. + taxis, order]

ataxia

Unsteadiness in standing and walking from a disorder of the control mechanisms in the brain, or from inadequate information input to the brain from the skin, muscles and joints. From the Greek a , not and taxis , order or arrangement.

Ataxia

The inability to control voluntary muscle movement, most frequently resulting from disorders in the brain or spinal cord.

ataxia

lack of proper control of movements, e.g. when drunk or in neurological disease.

ataxia

neurological diseases characterized by loss of coordinated voluntary muscular function (see Friedreich's ataxia)

ataxia (·taksˑ·ē·),

n postural imbalance and a staggering ambulatory style.

ataxia 

An inability to coordinate muscular activity during voluntary movements.

a·tax·i·a

(ă-taksē-ă)
Inability to coordinate muscle activity during voluntary movement; results from disorders of the cerebellum or posterior columns of spinal cord; may involve limbs, head, or trunk. Also called ataxy.
[G. a-prov. + taxis, order]

ataxia (ātak´sēə),

n a muscular incoordination characterized by irregular muscle activity.
ataxia, locomotor,

ataxia

failure of muscular coordination; irregularity of muscular action.

cerebellar ataxia
ataxia characterized by defects in rate, range, force and direction of movement of limbs. There is a broad based stance, inability to maintain the head in the proper position so that it oscillates, there is hypermetria or hypometria, direction cannot be maintained and the animal falls easily, often in an exaggerated way.
congenital ataxia
cerebellar ataxia due to viral infection of the fetus, e.g. bovine virus diarrhea and feline panleukopenia, or to inheritance, e.g. in cattle. See also cerebellar atrophy.
copper-related ataxia
see copper nutritional deficiency.
enzootic ataxia
see enzootic ataxia.
equine sensory ataxia
see enzootic equine incoordination.
familial convulsions and ataxia of cattle
see familial convulsions and ataxia of cattle.
feline ataxia
see feline panleukopenia.
foal ataxia
see enzootic equine incoordination.
frontal ataxia
disturbance of equilibrium occurring in cases of tumor of the frontal lobe.
hereditary ataxia
see hereditary ataxia.
hound ataxia
a degenerative myelopathy of Foxhounds, Harrier hounds and Beagles. Affected dogs show increasing hindleg incoordination. A dietary cause is suspected.
locomotor ataxia
tabes dorsalis.
otarid ataxia
a syndrome in pinnipeds caused by nutritional deficiency of thiamin or enterotoxemia or hypoglycemia. Signs include heelwalking (elevation and curling of the rear toes) followed by running staggers, ataxia and violent falling.
progressive ataxia
an inherited disease of cattle in which hind limb ataxia commences at 6 months to 3 years of age and worsens over 1 to 2 more years to the point of recumbency. It is a myelin disorder with eosinophilic plaques in the cerebellar medula and peduncles. Called also progressive sensory ataxia of Charolais cattle.
sensorimotor ataxia
caused by moderate spinal cord lesions, manifested by weakness of movement, scuffing of toes, incomplete limb extension, knuckling, wobbly gait, easy falling, difficult rising.
sensory ataxia
ataxia due to loss of proprioception (joint position sense), resulting in poorly judged movements and becoming aggravated when the eyes are blindfolded.
spinal ataxia
see equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.
vestibular ataxia
a loss of balance with preservation of strength. If unilateral, the abnormality is asymmetrical; if bilateral, it is symmetrical.

Patient discussion about ataxia

Q. Can I inherit ataxia to my children? I have Ataxia. Does this mean that all my kids will have it too?

A. The hereditary ataxias are genetic, which means they are caused by a defect in a certain gene that is present from the start of a person's life. There are both dominant and recessive ataxias. If it's a dominant ataxia then each child of a parent with an autosomal dominant ataxia gene has a 50/50 chance of whether they will inherit the ataxia gene or not. If it's recessive then it takes a "double dose" of the ataxia gene to result in disease symptoms. Both parents must be carriers of the disease gene in order for it to pass on. Each child of parents who are both carriers of a recessive disease has a 25% chance of inheriting two ataxia genes so will develop the disease, a 50% chance of inheriting just one of the ataxia genes and, therefore, be a carrier and a 25% chance of inheriting no ataxia gene and be completely free of ataxia.
Therefore, it depends which ataxia gene you have, if it's dominant or recessive and whether your spouse is a carrier too.

More discussions about ataxia
References in periodicals archive ?
The former Sky Sports pundit agreed to take on the challenge with Geraint to help him raise money for Ataxia UK.
Inicialmente se clasifico como una ataxia espinocerebelar pero luego fue reclasificada como un sindrome de deplecion de ADN mitocondrial.
Entre las secuelas se han descrito persistencia de la ataxia, anormalidades del lenguaje, problemas de comportamiento y trastornos del aprendizaje.
Oculocutaneous telangiectasia, the second diagnostic hallmark of ataxia-telangiectasia, (5) usually has a later onset than the ataxia, typically at age 3-6 years.
The report reviews pipeline therapeutics for Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA) by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
In this study, the cases diagnosed with hereditary ataxia in light of history neurological examination findings, and electrophysiological findings have been scrutinized in terms of FA and SCA types 1, 2, 3, and 6.
While the signs of cerebellar dysfunction had started acutely, their continuation for more than 2 weeks prompted further investigation for an inherited cause of progressive chronic ataxia (our differential diagnosis included ataxia telangiectasia (no telangiectasia were present clinically and the immunoglobulin levels were normal), abetalipoproteinaemia, Friedreich's ataxia and spinocerebellar ataxia.
The pizza sale was extremely welcome and pupils also manned stalls selling cakes, drinks and snacks as well as Ataxia wristbands.
Ataxia affects the central nervous system, causing problems with balance and coordination.
As ataxias espinocerebelares (AEC) sao um grupo heterogeneo de enfermidades neurodegenerativas, caracterizam-se pela presenca de ataxia cerebelar progressiva que tem como manifestacoes clinicas iniciais a deterioracao no equilibrio, na coordenacao motora e disturbios oculares [1-3].
Colin, who died in September the previous year from a heart attack aged 53, also suffered from ataxia - a degeneration of the part of the brain which affects balance and co-ordination.
UKPRwire, Tue Jun 03 2014] GlobalData's clinical trial report, "Cerebellar Ataxia Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2014" provides data on the Cerebellar Ataxia clinical trial scenario.