atavism

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atavism

 [at´ah-vizm]
apparent inheritance of characters from remote ancestors. adj., adj atavis´tic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·a·vism

(at'ă-vizm),
The appearance in an individual of characteristics presumed to have been present in some remote ancestor; reversion to an earlier biologic type, a throwback.
[L. atavus, a remote ancestor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

atavism

(ăt′ə-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. The reappearance of a characteristic in an organism after several generations of absence.
2. An individual or a part that exhibits atavism. Also called throwback.
3. The return of a trait or recurrence of previous behavior after a period of absence.

at′a·vist n.
at′a·vis′tic adj.
at′a·vis′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Any of a number of normally dormant traits—e.g., the presence in humans of multiple nipples, appearance of vestigial hind limbs in whales, or possibly hereditary hypertrichosis in humans
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

atavism

Any of a number of normally dormant traits–eg, the presence in humans of multiple nipples, appearance of vestigial hind limbs in whales, or possibly hereditary hypertrichosis in humans
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

at·a·vism

(at'ă-vizm)
The appearance in an individual of characteristics presumed to have been present in some remote ancestor; reversion to an earlier biologic type; a throwback.
[L. atavus, a remote ancestor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

atavism

The reappearance of a genetic characteristic after generations of absence. This may be caused by the coincidence of two recessive genes, by recombination, or by mutation. The organism or individual so produced is often called a ‘throwback’.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

atavism

the recurrence of a characteristic possessed by an ancestor after an absence for several generations.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, one will look in vain in his article for texts documenting the reading habits of real male and female readers that will corroborate the conclusions he draws based on this material: compared to men, he claims, women have less literary competence, read more atavistically, and satisfy their needs for fantasy more openly through reading.
As heroic as this character gets is depicted when he atavistically clutches a precious can of scavenged pickles and struggles desperately to open it -- until finally Captain Hosenfeld provides a can opener.
atavistically Christian Julio Dinis possibly aims to teach
In the case of homosexuality, the ability of the furtive lover to glance surreptitiously is seen as a distinguishing feature, inherited atavistically, if we are to believe the drama of Sodome et Gomorrhe.
In any case, their expectation reproduces exactly that of the newcomers to the Lagers, whether young or not; all of them, with the exception of those who had already gone through an analogous experience, expected to find a terrible but decipherable world, in conformity to that simple model which we atavistically carry within us--"we" inside and the enemy outside, separated by a sharply defined geographic frontier.
But like other products from exotic lands, we welcome novels that protest the politics of other countries; instinctively, almost atavistically, we sympathize with the foreign author's artistic dilemma--the need to produce a literary product that defies government bans, censorship rules and even threats of violence.
Out of distaste for the awkward formulation "he or she," or, worse yet, "s/he," I have chosen -- perhaps atavistically -- to let the masculine pronoun and possessive suffice throughout.
They have endeavoured to respond to and re-engage with the voters in two main ways which, however, have the disadvantage, in practice if not in principle, of being antipathetic to each other: In the first instance, they have tried somewhat atavistically to return to old nostrums by means of conviction politics and fundamentalist renewal.
Colacurcio admits that his own "theological biases are atavistically Thomist," and he assumes that Hawthorne's mind was also concentrated on theological issues.