atavism

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atavism

 [at´ah-vizm]
apparent inheritance of characters from remote ancestors. adj., adj atavis´tic.

at·a·vism

(at'ă-vizm),
The appearance in an individual of characteristics presumed to have been present in some remote ancestor; reversion to an earlier biologic type, a throwback.
[L. atavus, a remote ancestor]

atavism

/at·a·vism/ (at´ah-vizm) apparent inheritance of a characteristic from remote rather than immediate ancestors.atavis´tic

atavism

(ăt′ə-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. The reappearance of a characteristic in an organism after several generations of absence.
2. An individual or a part that exhibits atavism. Also called throwback.
3. The return of a trait or recurrence of previous behavior after a period of absence.

at′a·vist n.
at′a·vis′tic adj.
at′a·vis′ti·cal·ly adv.

atavism

[at′əviz′əm]
Etymology: L, atavus, ancestor
the appearance in an individual of traits or characteristics more like those of a grandparent or earlier ancestor than of the parents. Atavistic data may offer clues to an examining physician of genetic or familial health factors. atavistic, adj.
Any of a number of normally dormant traits—e.g., the presence in humans of multiple nipples, appearance of vestigial hind limbs in whales, or possibly hereditary hypertrichosis in humans

atavism

Any of a number of normally dormant traits–eg, the presence in humans of multiple nipples, appearance of vestigial hind limbs in whales, or possibly hereditary hypertrichosis in humans

at·a·vism

(at'ă-vizm)
The appearance in an individual of characteristics presumed to have been present in some remote ancestor; reversion to an earlier biologic type; a throwback.
[L. atavus, a remote ancestor]

atavism

The reappearance of a genetic characteristic after generations of absence. This may be caused by the coincidence of two recessive genes, by recombination, or by mutation. The organism or individual so produced is often called a ‘throwback’.

atavism

the recurrence of a characteristic possessed by an ancestor after an absence for several generations.

atavism

apparent inheritance of characters from remote ancestors, caused by recessive genes. Called also 'throwback'.
References in periodicals archive ?
Videos were supplemental to the magazine-length pieces we published at The Atavist until I decided to flip that equation--let the film be long-form with the text as the shorter element.
She went down there and I convinced her to do the story for our collaboration with The Atavist.
I sent my pitch to Evan Ratliff, editor of The Atavist, and after a little back and forth, he said yes.
While I was doing what I normally do--reporting, writing and rewriting--Ratliffand Atavist producer Olivia Koski had been scheming ways to enliven the reader experience.
Those promoting cultural/ethnic objections to the "development vision" were seen as divisive atavists, whose attitudes arose either from an earlier privileged or dominant status in the ancien regime, or just plain "backwardness".
However, the Act needs to be considerably developed and strengthened, not tinkered with and compromised in response to the all-too-predictable bile directed at it by the usual gang of xenophobes, authoritarians and constitutional atavists.
Club, spiritual Valhalla of atavists and revanchists everywhere, entered
Although librarians, and atavists of all ages, may bemoan the eventual demise of the medium of choice for the past few hundred years, I shall not be among them.
The belt's nearest asteroids are M-types, highly reflective iron-nickel objects that scientists believe are tantalizing atavists of planetary cores.
Historically, the Gospels would have made little sense to an earlier audience of uncritical atavists like Homer's Greeks: e.
While Spenser and Davies largely suppress these reflexive ironies unsettling the Roman critique of barbarism (a matter to which we shall return), in virtually every other respect they depict (no pun intended) the Irish as atavists of the northern European barbarians found in Caesar and Tacitus.