population

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population

 [pop″u-la´shun]
1. the individuals collectively constituting a certain category or inhabiting a specified geographic area.
2. in genetics, a stable group of randomly interbreeding individuals.
3. in statistics, a theoretical concept used to describe an entire group or collection of units, finite or infinite; from it a sample can be drawn.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn),
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class. Compare: sample.
[L. populus, a people, nation]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

population

(pŏp′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. All of the people inhabiting a specified area.
b. The total number of such people.
2. The total number of inhabitants constituting a particular race, class, or group in a specified area.
3. The act or process of furnishing with inhabitants.
4. Ecology All the organisms that constitute a specific group or occur in a specified habitat.
5. Statistics The set of individuals, items, or data from which a statistical sample is taken. Also called universe.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

population

EBM
A collection of subjects from which a sample is drawn for a study to obtain estimates for values that would be obtained if the entire population was studied.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

population

Clinical research Universe A group of persons to be described or about which one wishes to generalize, assuming that the group is representative of an entire population. See Control population, Patient population Global village The aggregate of persons in a specified area. See Zero population growth.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class.
Compare: sample (1)
[L. populus, a people, nation]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

population

  1. the total number of the individuals of a particular species, race or form of animal or plant, inhabiting a particular locality or region.
  2. (in genetics) the total number of BREEDING INDIVIDUALS of a species in a particular location.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a class.
[L. populus, a people, nation]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
ABSTRACT An innovative student-to-student peer mentoring teaching strategy was used to deliver health care to at-risk populations in a community-based setting.
The function [THETA](t) represents the daily baseline hazard function multiplied by the effects of time-varying individual covariates averaged over the at-risk population. First, it is reasonable to model [R.sup.(l)](t) as a smooth function in time because it is a summation of the individual covariate effects over the at-risk population in the lth strata.
Depletion of the at-risk population acts to flatten the exposure--response mortality curve.
'Periodic treatment of at-risk populations will cure mild symptoms and also prevent infected people from developing severe, late-stage chronic disease,'' he said.
"HB 4364 seeks to curb the spread of diabetes and other health complications among Texans in at-risk populations by eliminating sugary drinks and snacks from the state's nutrition assistance program."
BB&T covers training, transportation, lodging and other expenses for educators from schools that primarily serve low-income and at-risk populations and demonstrate a commitment to applying innovative approaches for student success.
Dr Cheema, director of the Institute for Population Health and assistant professor of healthcare policy and research, said:"The consensus is that the best way to eliminate HCV infection is to focus interventions on at-risk populations, such as people who inject drugs, people who have had blood transfusions, prisoners, and people who engage in risky sexual practices, among others." "Unfortunately, many of the systematic reviews of HCV in the MENA region use data from mixed populations at differing risk of exposure to HCV, rather than targeted sub-sections of the population.
Dr Cheema, director of the Institute for Population Health and assistant professor of healthcare policy and research, said, "The consensus is that the best way to eliminate HCV infection is to focus interventions on at-risk populations, such as people who inject drugs, people who have had blood transfusions, prisoners, and people who engage in risky sexual practices, among others.
Numerous studies have shown that early detection and treatment of CAD can reduce the incidence of heart attacks in at-risk populations. Studies have also shown that coronary artery calcium score is useful for risk stratification of patients.
The authors note that in order to reach the targets by 2030, approximately 14.5 million adults in at-risk populations would need to be screened to diagnose an estimated 870,000 undiagnosed cases.
ESFI president, Brett Brenner, said, 'Raising awareness among the most at-risk populations is crucial to preventing home fires, fire deaths, and related injuries.