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risk

 [risk]
a danger or hazard; the probability of suffering harm.
attributable risk the amount or proportion of incidence of disease or death (or risk of disease or death) in individuals exposed to a specific risk factor that can be attributed to exposure to that factor; the difference in the risk for unexposed versus exposed individuals.
empiric risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family based solely on experience rather than on knowledge of the causative mechanism. See also genetic risk.
genetic risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family, based on knowledge of its genetic pattern of transmission. See also empiric risk.
relative risk for a disease, death, or other outcome, the ratio of the incidence rate among individuals with a given risk factor to the incidence rate among those without it.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

risk

(risk), In idiomatic English one is at risk of, not for, a disease, injury, or other untoward event. Avoid redundant phrases such a possible risk and potential risk; an element of uncertainty is inherent in the meaning of the word.
The probability that an event will occur.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

risk

(rĭsk)
n.
The possibility of suffering harm or loss; danger.

risk′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

risk

EBM
In clinical trials, a term referring to the possibility of harm or discomfort for study participants.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

risk

Epidemiology The chance or likelihood that an undesirable event or effect will occur, as a result of use or nonuse, incidence, or influence of a chemical, physical, or biologic agent, especially during a stated period; the probability of developing a given disease over a specified time period. See Minimal risk Managed care The chance or possibility of loss. See Risk sharing Occupational medicine A value determined by the potential severity of the hazard and the frequency of exposure to the 'risky' substance or activity, usually understood to mean the probability of suffering from a particular disease Risk assessment The probability that something will cause injury, combined with the potential severity of that injury. See Absolute risk, Acceptable risk, Assigned risk, Attributable risk, Cancer risk, Cardiac risk, Dread risk, Hazard risk rating, High risk/high impact, Incremental risk, Lifetime risk, No significant risk, Nonattributable risk, Thick conception of risk, Thin conception of risk, Unknown risk.
Risks of disease
Infection
HBV  1:63,000
HCV 1:103,000
HIV 1:493,000
HTLV I/II 1:641,000
HAV  1:1,000,000
Other morbid conditions
MVA 1:6,700
Flood 1:450,000
Earthquake 1:600,000
Lightning 1:1,000,000
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

risk

(risk)
1. The probability that an event will occur.
2. The possibility of adverse consequences.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

risk

(risk)
Probability that an event will occur.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
465 (b) (4) is "to suspend at risk treatment where a transaction is structured--by whatever method--to remove any realistic possibility that the taxpayer v,511 suffer an economic loss if the transaction turns out to be unprofitable." Worst-case scenarios are not appropriate when determining whether a Sec.
A chain of recourse notes can be established between a taxpayer and a creditor outside of the circular transaction; the creditor has no disincentive to calling the loan in the event of default, theoretically establishing "at risk." The court concluded that, despite the existence of "risk" in the circular transaction, the existence of the FSC guarantee and the theoretical nature of the taxpayer's scenario for risk were the determining factors in establishing that he was not at-risk within the meaning of Sec.
* Starting at age 45, get your fasting blood glucose level tested every three years--earlier and more frequently if you have risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" p.
However, it is important to recognize that this type of federal "intervention" does not place taxpayer funds at risk.
As is the case for home mortgage lending or any other banking activity, whether proprietary trading places the deposit insurance fund at risk depends on the bank's capital, the degree of concentration in its risk exposures, the strength of its risk management systems and internal controls, and the expertise of its personnel, including senior management and risk managers as well as traders.
The limitations of treating infectious disease transmission as a static disease process, with no interaction between those infected or diseased and those at risk, have been illustrated in studies of Giardia (8), dengue (2), and sexually transmitted diseases (26).
Overall rates of HIV testing were consistently higher among Americans who were at risk than among those who were not.
Blacks who either reported a risk factor or who perceived themselves to be at risk were also more likely to have been tested in the past year (40%) than were similar Hispanics (28%) or whites (23%).
* DuPont advanced financial risk measurement even further by developing earnings at risk (EAR) measurement tools, To DuPont, VAR was not as helpful because it's a concept that's hard for some managers to understand and manage.
When you look at risk as an investment decision, figuring out how much risk to retain - and when - gets more complicated.
The 'risk registry' thereby encourages businesses to look at risks from a different perspective and points to potential disaster areas the business may not have considered.