asymbolia


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a·sym·bo·li·a

(ā-sim-bō'lē-ă),
A form of aphasia in which the significance of signs and symbols is not appreciated. Synonym(s): sight blindness
[G. a- priv. + symbolon, an outward sign]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

a·sym·bo·li·a

(ā-sim-bō'lē-ă)
A form of aphasia in which the significance of signs and symbols is not appreciated.
Synonym(s): asemasia, asemia.
[G. a- priv. + symbolon, an outward sign]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

asymbolia

(a?sim-bo'le-a) [ ¹an- + symbolon, a token, sign + -ia]
Inability to comprehend words, gestures, or any type of symbol. Synonym: asemia See: aphasia

pain asymbolia

A rare neurological condition in which a person experiences pain, does not find it troubling, but is indifferent to it.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

asymbolia

A form of APHASIA in which there is inability to interpret or use symbols such as words, gestures, numbers, diagrams, musical notation or any form of writing. See APHASIA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The retreat into asymbolia is therefore a form of mourning for the lost maternal object.
Where Kristeva insists that melancholy writing tends towards 'asymbolia' or blankness, Loffler finds a trajectory towards unreadability.
I shall call melancholia the institutional symptomatology of inhibition and asymbolia that becomes established now and then or chronically in a person, alternating more often than not with the so-called manic phase of exaltation.
Instead, there is "a downfall...into the invisible and unnameable" (Kristeva 1989, 15), a "sinking into the blankness of asymbolia" (Kristeva 1989, 33), as the heroine is sucked back into the masochistic jouissance of surrogate maternal subjection.
With this in mind, it is worthwhile remembering Kristeva's view that the speech of the depressed is 'repetitive and monotonous [...] they utter sentences that are interrupted, exhausted, come to a standstill [...] A repetitive rhythm, a monotonous melody emerge [...] on account of the pressure of silence, the melancholy person sink[s] into the blankness of asymbolia' (BS, p.