astrobiology

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as·tro·bi·ol·o·gy

(as'trō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
The discipline concerned with all aspects of human and terrestrial biology as affected by extraterrestrial travel, and any and all aspects of extraterrestrial biologic systems.

astrobiology

(as″trō-bī-ol′ŏ-jē) [ astro- + biology]
Study of extraterrestrial life.
astrobiologic (-bī-ŏ-loj′ik), adjectiveastrobiologist (-bī-ol′ŏ-jist)
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References in periodicals archive ?
"If you didn't know that truffles like oak forests, you might spend a lot of time looking for them in pine forests and never find a truffle." He says he hopes organisms with a different genetic code can help astrobiologists distinguish between the planetary equivalents of oak and pine forests to root out alien species.
NASA astrobiologist Cassie Conley said the exact survival time of the water bears would depend on the condition of the impact site and the temperatures to which they are exposed.
de Rebolledo a former Culture & Science journalist turned to an Astrobiologist after five years researching in thousands of NASA pictures taken in planet Mars.
This is what the environment, in which the team had to operate, looked like during the simulated mission to the Moon, led by Slovak astrobiologist Michaela Musilova.
The experiment was conducted by astrobiologist Laurie Barge and her team by creating miniature seafloors inside the lab-"mini-oceans", in other words.
Dr Rosalba Bonaccorsi, an astrobiologist from the SETI Institute at Nasa Ames Research Centre, is in Dubai as a guest lecturer for a winter space camp being held in Abu Dhabi by Compass International.
As astrobiologist (and S&T columnist) David Grinspoon says in our cover story on page 14, "We have no hope of making sense of those [exo-Venus] observations without getting a handle on the Venus-Earth dichotomy."
US astrobiologist Professor Kirk Schulze-Makuch, from Washington State University, said: "If liquid water and a significant atmosphere were present on the early moon for long periods of time, we think the lunar surface would have been at least transiently habitable."
"This paper really seals the deal," Daniel Glavin, astrobiologist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Centre who was not involved in the study, was quoted as saying.
"There's a direct path from the conclusions of our work to the possible discovery, which would be a historic one, of life elsewhere," said senior author David Catling, a planetary scientist and astrobiologist at the University of Washington in Seattle.
Not a single personal insult was uttered by any member of the crew during the whole of the "mission" that ended on September 17, claimed astrobiologist Sam Payler, 28, a Phd student at the University of Edinburgh.