astringent

(redirected from astringently)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

astringent

 [ah-strin´jent]
1. causing contraction or arresting discharges.
2. an agent that causes contraction or arrests discharges, usually locally after topical application. Astringents act as protein precipitants and arrest discharge by causing shrinkage of tissue. Skin preparations such as shaving lotions often contain astringents such as aluminum acetate that help to reduce oiliness and excessive perspiration. Witch hazel is a common household astringent used to reduce swelling. Styptic pencils, used to stop bleeding from small cuts, contain astringents. Zinc oxide and calamine are astringents used in lotions, powders, and ointments to relieve itching and chafing in various forms of dermatitis. Some astringents, such as tannic acid, have been used in treating diarrhea; others, such as boric acid and sodium borate, help relieve the symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membranes of the throat or conjunctiva of the eye. Astringents have some bacteriostatic properties, though they are not generally used as antiseptics.

as·trin·gent

(as-trin'jent),
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

(ə-strĭn′jənt)
adj.
Medicine Tending to draw together or constrict tissues; styptic.
n.
A substance or preparation, such as alum, that draws together or constricts body tissues and is effective in stopping the flow of blood or other secretions.

as·trin′gen·cy n.
as·trin′gent·ly adv.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application.
 
Herbal medicine
noun Any herb that hardens and contracts tissues due to its high tannin content, preventing bacterial penetration and inhibiting discharges, diarrhoea and haemorrhage.

Pharmacology
A topical agent (e.g., aluminum-based compounds) that can be variably used: as topical haemostatics, to precipitate proteins, reduce mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and to act as antiperspirants.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application noun Pharmacology A topical agent–eg, aluminum-based compounds, used to precipitate proteins, as topical hemostatics, to ↓ mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and as an antiperspirant

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

1. A drug that shrinks cells and tightens surfaces by denaturing cell protein.
2. Having the property of tightening surfaces.

astringent 

A chemical substance that causes contraction of soft organic tissues by precipitating proteins from their surfaces. Astringents are incorporated into some artificial tears. Examples: acetylcysteine, witch hazel, zinc sulfate. See artificial tears.

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]
References in periodicals archive ?
Atwood has a gift for the astringently grotesque image and event.
Astringently blasting Israel as an "oppressive and murderous entity", Shamout said Israeli politicians and officers must be taken to the International Criminal Court (ICC), it added.
During November 2001 the Danish People's Party of Pia Kjaersgaard, who has astringently condemned Sweden's indulgence towards what she calls "Scandinavian Beiruts", (6) increased its vote to 12 per cent, and its representation in the 179-seat parliament from 13 to 22.
The Allegro vivace is astringently vibrant, Monteux using minimal gestures to indicate the dynamic marking and obtaining wonderful clarity to the orchestral sound.
Croft, a finger for Margaret Hamilton's Wicked Witch in her black crinoline, is astringently funny as Freddy's scolding mother, Davies vivid and robust as the gallant Mr.
Assumptions about responsibility did not differ between the technical literature and that aimed at lay audiences except that physicians tended to speak more astringently than many writers in the popular literature.