astringent


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astringent

 [ah-strin´jent]
1. causing contraction or arresting discharges.
2. an agent that causes contraction or arrests discharges, usually locally after topical application. Astringents act as protein precipitants and arrest discharge by causing shrinkage of tissue. Skin preparations such as shaving lotions often contain astringents such as aluminum acetate that help to reduce oiliness and excessive perspiration. Witch hazel is a common household astringent used to reduce swelling. Styptic pencils, used to stop bleeding from small cuts, contain astringents. Zinc oxide and calamine are astringents used in lotions, powders, and ointments to relieve itching and chafing in various forms of dermatitis. Some astringents, such as tannic acid, have been used in treating diarrhea; others, such as boric acid and sodium borate, help relieve the symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membranes of the throat or conjunctiva of the eye. Astringents have some bacteriostatic properties, though they are not generally used as antiseptics.

as·trin·gent

(as-trin'jent),
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

(ə-strĭn′jənt)
adj.
Medicine Tending to draw together or constrict tissues; styptic.
n.
A substance or preparation, such as alum, that draws together or constricts body tissues and is effective in stopping the flow of blood or other secretions.

as·trin′gen·cy n.
as·trin′gent·ly adv.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application.
 
Herbal medicine
noun Any herb that hardens and contracts tissues due to its high tannin content, preventing bacterial penetration and inhibiting discharges, diarrhoea and haemorrhage.

Pharmacology
A topical agent (e.g., aluminum-based compounds) that can be variably used: as topical haemostatics, to precipitate proteins, reduce mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and to act as antiperspirants.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application noun Pharmacology A topical agent–eg, aluminum-based compounds, used to precipitate proteins, as topical hemostatics, to ↓ mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and as an antiperspirant

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

1. A drug that shrinks cells and tightens surfaces by denaturing cell protein.
2. Having the property of tightening surfaces.

astringent 

A chemical substance that causes contraction of soft organic tissues by precipitating proteins from their surfaces. Astringents are incorporated into some artificial tears. Examples: acetylcysteine, witch hazel, zinc sulfate. See artificial tears.

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]
References in periodicals archive ?
The FDA also called on All Local Government Units (LGUs) and Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) to ensure that the Original PorcelanaA(r) Astringent Improved Formula is not sold or made available in their localities or areas of jurisdiction.
Varietal differences in the ease of astringency removal by carbon dioxide gas and ethanol vapor treatments among Oriental astringent persimmons of Japanese and Chinese origin.
Introduce high-quality varieties/strains of astringent persimmon and mushroom and assist Royal Project Foundation technicians in selecting varieties/strains that will raise quality and yield.
"The opposition between fatty and astringent sensations allows us to eat fatty foods more easily if we also ingest astringents with them," he said.
This rose comes on in an irresistible rush of ripe strawberries, raspberries and cherries tempered by just a hint of astringent gooseberry, a sort of cream soda for the grownup palate.
Once in the wine, tannins form longer and longer chains, in the process becoming smoother and less astringent, until finally after long aging they become so large they precipitate out.
Portraits of particular bears look at the black grizzly, the education of the Astringent Creek grizzly, and the bear who crossed the freeway.
He calls it "moody, astringent, microscopically observed.
Astringent varieties, such as 'Hachiya' and American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), are most delicious when jelly soft.
Brightly colored with a glossy, deep orange-red skin, persimmons are classified as astringent or nonastringent.
Ingredients: 2 1/2 gallons water 1/4 cucumber, unpeeled (astringent) 1/2 lemon, peeled--rind optional (astringent and oil remover) 1/2 tsp mustard, powder or fresh (soothing, cleansing) 1/4 tsp peppermint extract/essential oil or fresh mint leaves to your liking (stimulating, invigorating, cooling)
The aronia plant, which is native to eastern North America and commonly known as black chokeberry, produces violet-black berries having a noticeably astringent, sweet-sour flavor with bitter notes.