astringent

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astringent

 [ah-strin´jent]
1. causing contraction or arresting discharges.
2. an agent that causes contraction or arrests discharges, usually locally after topical application. Astringents act as protein precipitants and arrest discharge by causing shrinkage of tissue. Skin preparations such as shaving lotions often contain astringents such as aluminum acetate that help to reduce oiliness and excessive perspiration. Witch hazel is a common household astringent used to reduce swelling. Styptic pencils, used to stop bleeding from small cuts, contain astringents. Zinc oxide and calamine are astringents used in lotions, powders, and ointments to relieve itching and chafing in various forms of dermatitis. Some astringents, such as tannic acid, have been used in treating diarrhea; others, such as boric acid and sodium borate, help relieve the symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membranes of the throat or conjunctiva of the eye. Astringents have some bacteriostatic properties, though they are not generally used as antiseptics.

as·trin·gent

(as-trin'jent),
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

(ə-strĭn′jənt)
adj.
Medicine Tending to draw together or constrict tissues; styptic.
n.
A substance or preparation, such as alum, that draws together or constricts body tissues and is effective in stopping the flow of blood or other secretions.

as·trin′gen·cy n.
as·trin′gent·ly adv.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application.
 
Herbal medicine
noun Any herb that hardens and contracts tissues due to its high tannin content, preventing bacterial penetration and inhibiting discharges, diarrhoea and haemorrhage.

Pharmacology
A topical agent (e.g., aluminum-based compounds) that can be variably used: as topical haemostatics, to precipitate proteins, reduce mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and to act as antiperspirants.

astringent

adjective Causing local contraction after topical application noun Pharmacology A topical agent–eg, aluminum-based compounds, used to precipitate proteins, as topical hemostatics, to ↓ mucosal inflammation, toughen skin, promote healing, as antiseptics, and as an antiperspirant

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]

astringent

1. A drug that shrinks cells and tightens surfaces by denaturing cell protein.
2. Having the property of tightening surfaces.

astringent 

A chemical substance that causes contraction of soft organic tissues by precipitating proteins from their surfaces. Astringents are incorporated into some artificial tears. Examples: acetylcysteine, witch hazel, zinc sulfate. See artificial tears.

as·trin·gent

(ă-strin'jĕnt)
1. Causing contraction or shrinkage of the tissues, arrest of secretion, or control of bleeding.
2. An agent having these effects.
[L. astringens]
References in periodicals archive ?
On the nature of coagulated tannins in astringency-type persimmon fruit after an artificial treatment of astringency removal.
The Healthy Harvest line of pasta by New World Pasta (www.newworldpasta.com) Harrisburg, Pa., uses a blend of whole-grain derivatives from different sources and matches the final composition to whole-wheat flour, selecting components without the astringency or darkness typically associated with whole-wheat pastas.
Typical Bowmore suppleness but a tannic astringency cuts into its usual velvety texture and turns it into nubbly silk.
We measured foliar astringency, hydrolysable tannins, and condensed tannins in the foliage of red maple and red oak saplings in hurricane-damaged and undamaged sites.
Accompanied by three female dancers and a jazzy live musical trio, wiry Antoni Aparisi Sevilla lent a postmodern astringency to his Gene Kelly charm in De Puertas Hacia Dentro.
Dixon shows how Goldsmith improved on the models for his observant exile (Montesquieu, Lyttleton, d'Argens), and also highlights, in The Citizen and elsewhere, an astringency, a sharp social concern which has been ignored by readers prepared for 'charming and aimiable' writing.
The astringency of S.'s argument will temper overly Christian and overly thematic readings alike.
Cambridge criticism conformed to no special type, but its analytical bent, astringency, and disdain of merely appreciative writing sprang from its creators' formidable training and interests in philosophy, linguistics, psychology, and social sciences and from their immense reading in literature.
Raspberry leaves and root bark can be used, too, to help control diarrhea, because its astringency effectively tones inflamed or irritated tissues.
They conducted a sensory session with trained panelists using quantitative descriptive analysis to assess the intensity of 10 beer descriptors such as: yeast, grains and hops aromas; hops flavor; bitter, sour and sweet tastes; viscosity; carbonation; and astringency.