assortative mating


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as·sort·a·tive mat·ing

selection of a mate with preference for (or aversion to) a particular genotype, that is, nonrandom mating.
Synonym(s): nonrandom mating

non-random mating

Mating between two genetically compatible organisms in which the pairing combinations are influenced or controlled in some fashion.

as·sort·a·tive mat·ing

(ă-sōrt'ă-tiv māt'ing)
Selection of a mate with preference for (or aversion to) a particular genotype, i.e., nonrandom mating.

assortative mating

a type of cross in which the choice of partner is affected by the GENOTYPE, i.e. mating is nonrandom. For example, human matings are often assortative with respect to racial features since persons of one racial group may tend to have children by partners of the same group. This choice of mates means that genotypic frequencies predicted by the HARDY-WEINBERG LAW may not be found. See also RANDOM MATING, INTERBREED.
References in periodicals archive ?
This seems to indicate that assortative mating does not play a strong role in our sample to start with.
Assortative mating for psychiatric disorders and psychological traits.
2000), and that, in turn, promote assortative mating preferences (Calkins & Parker 2005; Rull et al.
Perhaps as a result, the rate of assortative mating for black women with college degrees is much lower than that for white women.
(2006) have shown there is assortative mating for a romantic partner in personality along with preference for higher or lower levels of particular traits in an ideal partner.
A variety of mechanisms permit assortative mating and allow genetically distinct but reproductively compatible populations of species to persist in the same habitat.
Assortative mating and partner influence on antisocial behavior across the life course.
This indicates that patients with bipolar disorder might tend to choose partners who also suffer from mental illness, a pattern known as assortative mating.
The research team found that pleiotropy and assortative mating were about equally responsible for the genetic connection between height and IQ.
Finally, 40%-60%-of caregivers qualify for a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder; as with depression, the nonbiological relatives were more symptomatic than were the blood relatives, lending support to the theory of assortative mating.
Significant assortative mating based on colorimetric phenotype occurred on the colony, but a low number of L.