assortative


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assortative

/as·sor·ta·tive/ (ah-sor´tah-tiv) characterized by or pertaining to selection on the basis of likeness or kind.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rationale behind the household-specific effect is that it will partially capture ability, at least at the household level, rationalized for example by the presence of assortative mating and/or genetic endowments or, more generally, intergenerational transmission of human capital.
Today, women at the top of the income scale are the most likely to marry, and assortative mating--when partners with similar levels of education marry one another--has increased.
In addition, our findings were robust to the assumption of a more assortative mixing between classes of sexual activity, with prevalence increasing from 3.
2009), "Educational Assortative Marriage in Comparative Perspective", Annual Review of Sociology, vol.
One might expect PA to show good performance on assortative networks and poor performance on disassortative networks.
It is quite likely that high levels of assortative unions within tribes and sub-tribes (Wahab and Ahmad, 1996), geopolitical turmoil in the last decades, and migrations and fragmentations, are responsible for this pronounced diversification in Pashtuns.
Assortative mating is the process by which people of similar backgrounds, such as educational attainment or financial means, select a partner.
The Masdar Institute entry titled 'Misery Loves Company: Twitter Sentiment Reveals Assortative Mixing of Aggregate Happiness in Urban Communication Networks' was chosen from among 652 entries submitted to the challenge.
A recent study shows that there has been a rise in assortative mating-that is, the tendency of people with similar characteristics to marry--and that this increase correlates with greater household income inequality.
It includes three parts: descriptive characteristics analysis, assortative analysis, and structural analysis.
The canonical added worker hypothesis stipulates that earnings shocks of husbands and wives are negatively correlated--a fall in husband earnings due to unemployment is offset (at least partially) by a rise in earnings of the wife--but if there is assortative matching in the marriage market and both spouses work in similar industries/occupations then it is possible that earnings shocks are positively correlated (Lundberg 1985; Shimer and Smith 2000).