assonance

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assonance

(as′ŏ-năns) [L. assonare, to sound to, answer to]
1. Similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. Abnormal tendency to use alliteration.
assonant (-nănt), adjective
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References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, the formal elements of "Ella," the volume's first poem - assonance and alliteration (the 'o,' 'a,' and 'u,' and 'r,' 'z,' 'd,' and 'n' sounds), and the assonantal rhyme of the even lines produce the sort of lyrical sonority typical of the popularly derived romance.
12) Foreshadowed by the elliptical statements that indicate a disconnection of the signifying chain, the irruption of lalangue via, for example, the assonantal echoes in 'grief' and 'leaf' exists on the borders of the poem's central (psychic) silence where meaning collapses.
(8) In an interview with Arnaldo Saraiva, Cabral spoke of his use of eight-syllable lines and assonantal rhyme as aimed at challenging readers' expectations and creating a less harmonious verse: 'O tipo de verso mais comum entre nos e o septissylabo, enquanto em Franca e o de 8 sylabas, que e o menos espontaneo da lyngua portuguesa--e que e o que eu prefiro, embora usando a liberdade typica do verso de 7 sylabas, de acentuar onde eu quiser.
The sound in this stanza is assonantal, the major centering sound pattern, and the words linked by assonance are in close proximity ("glazed" and "rain") rather than spread evenly throughout the stanzas, as they were with the consonantal linkages.
In the concluding sonnet, spiky consonance and straining assonantal rhyme transport the poet through the time and spaces of our lives: So deeper into it, crowd-swept, strap-hanging, My lofted arm a-swivel like a flail, My lather's glazed face in my own waning And craning ...
The translator is therefore forced to vary the rhyming scheme, resorting to partial or assonantal rhymes, and "in desperation" he admits to having "simply ducked for cover and run?' Here is how Sifried dies: Then Krimhild's husband fell among the flowers.
An aesthetic experience of Keats's Odes does indeed progressively refine, as Bate's Stylistic Development of Keats demonstrates in exquisite detail, the "raw morphological data" of assonantal, consonantal, and metric units.
If an example such as line 2127 is examined, the conclusion is that the concept of assonance change is inappropriate, because it is a verso suelto (sometimes translated as 'independent line') and does not serve as the start of a new assonantal series.
As corresponding or reminiscent in the text or rhetoric, consider these widely spaced passages of Dickens's alliterative, assonantal, often metrical prose: "Toby Veck, Toby Veck, waiting for you Toby!