assonance


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Related to assonance: onomatopoeia

assonance

(as′ŏ-năns) [L. assonare, to sound to, answer to]
1. Similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. Abnormal tendency to use alliteration.
assonant (-nănt), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
What issues from the five players can in no way be confused with "sweet assonance."
Another common characteristic found in both sources is the use of poetic devices called assonance, or internal rhyme, and alliteration.
Indeed, intellectually, I worship the ground on which they tread, for knowing how to employ the wonderful tools of poetry - rhyme, assonance, alliteration, rhythm and simile - without being "lettered".
Her chosen subject is enormously complicated, and Wales acknowledges that she can do little more than open it up to future researchers; as in the area of possible reasons for language choice (one aspect of which she ignores is the rhetorical pull of patterns of sound such as alliteration and assonance).
The assonance and alliteration of Poe's weighty "The Bells" is born again as "The Smells," with odes to salty seashores and just-mowed grass.
Twice a month, Costa Coffee on Bold Street transforms itself into Liverpool Poetry Cafe, where Mersey side literary buffs discuss everything from assonance to alliteration, and onomatopoeia to ottava rima over a nice cup of coffee and piece of cake.
In the main clause, the letters n, l and r in "tournent leurs" similarly recur in reverse order in "robes de laine." In the final prepositional phrase, the mirroring effect becomes more complex, occurring in the sequence d, r, d in "dans les herbages d'acier" and "d'emeraude" and in the assonance surrounding the two ds at the center: the two [a] sounds in "herbages d'acier" and the three [e] sounds in "acier et d'emeraude." Not only does each segment of the sentence contain the same type of pattern, but this pattern corresponds to the syntax of the sentence as a whole: the inverse repetition creates a mirroring effect emphasizing the center, just as the two prepositional phrases mirror each other and emphasize the centrality of the main clause.
By sound--the whole bolus--I mean actual sonic business (phonemes, assonance, consonance, all those named things that buzz around).
Nevertheless the "Blair Chair", we suggest, owes its existence as much to assonance as achievement.
Unfortunately, "purest profundity" is not a particularly egregious example of the author's ready recourse to arid alliteration, nor is "allergic/allegory/attacks" an isolated instance of acerbating assonance (please pardon the parody).
In the process, however, he did establish the standard terminology, distinguishing between a syllable's assonance (word- or syllable-initial consonant cluster), and its rime (concatenated vocalic nucleus and final consonant cluster); thus in the word stump, for instance, the assonance is st- and the rime is -ump.
"Lederer and Shore's Comma Sense--bear in mind that it's their first collaboration--is speckled with humor so lame that it keeps falling on its assonance." Whoever wrote that callous, brutal comment about Comma Sense must be lacking in their own sense of humor.