association

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Related to associational: seek out, passed on, lined up, dropping by

association

 [ah-so″se-a´shun]
1. a state in which two attributes occur together either more or less often than expected by chance.
2. in neurology, a term applied to those regions of the brain (association areas) that link the primary motor and sensory areas.
3. in genetics, the occurrence together of two or more phenotypic characteristics more often than would be expected by chance. To be distinguished from linkage (q.v.).
4. in psychiatry, a connection between ideas or feelings, especially between conscious thoughts and elements of the unconscious, or the formation of such a connection.
clang association see clanging.
free association in psychoanalysis, verbal expression by the patient of ideas as they arrive spontaneously, without censoring or withholding anything, no matter how distressing, embarrassing, trivial, or irrelevant it may seem. The analyst forms tentative explanations of the patient's associations and experiences but withholds them until they are validated by more material and until the patient is in a receptive frame of mind.
association test one based on associative reaction, usually by mentioning words to a patient and noting what other words he or she gives as the ones called to mind; see association (def. 4).

as·so·ci·a·tion

(ă-sō'sē-ā'shŭn),
1. A connection of people, things, or ideas by some common factor.
See also: conditioning.
See also: genetic association.
2. A functional connection of two ideas, events, or psychological phenomena established through learning or experience.
See also: conditioning.
See also: genetic association.
3. Statistical dependence between two or more events, characteristics, or other variables.
See also: genetic association.
4. genetics a grouping of congenital anomalies found together more frequently than otherwise expected; use of this term implies that the cause is unknown.
See also: genetic association.
[L. as-socio, pp. -sociatus, to join to; ad + socius, companion]

association

Epidemiology
noun A statistical relationship between two or more events, characteristics or other variables—e.g., an association between exposure to X and a health effect, Y—which may not imply cause and effect.

EBM
noun A known link or a statistical dependence between two or more events, conditions, characteristics or other variables.
 
Genetics
noun
(1) The simultaneous occurrence ≥ 2 phenotypic characteristics more often than would be expected by change.
(2) The non-random occurrence in ≥ 2 individuals of multiple anomalies not known to correspond to a polytopic field defect, sequence or syndrome.
 
Informatics
noun The relationship between a client node and a client schedule, which identifies the names of a schedule, the policy domain to which the schedule belongs and the client node that performs scheduled operations.
 
Managed care
See Captive IPA.
 
Neurology
adjective Referring to an area of the brain that links motor and sensory cortical areas.
     
Psychiatry
noun
(1) Any connection between the conscious and the unconscious.
(2) A relationship between ideas and emotions by contiguity, continuity or similarity.

Support services
See Joint Underwriters Association.
 
Vox populi
noun An organised group of similarly-minded individuals (e.g., American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, American Osteopathic Association, Independent Practice Association, etc.).

association

adjective Neurology Referring to an area of the brain that links motor and sensory cortical areas. See Visual association noun Epidemiology A statistical relationship between two or more events, characteristics, or other variables–eg, an association between an exposure to X and a health effect. Y, which does not necessarily imply cause and effect Psychiatry
1. Any connection between the conscious and the unconscious.
2. A relationship between ideas and emotions by contiguity, continuity, or similarity. See Clang association, Direct association, Free association, Loosening of associations, Strength of association Vox populi An organized group of similarly-minded individuals. See AALAS, American Association of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine, American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, American Osteopathic Association, Blue Cross & Blue Shield Association, Independent practice association, International Association of Cancer Victims & Friends, National Rifle Association, World Medical Association.

as·so·ci·a·tion

(ă-sō'sē-ā'shŭn)
1. A connection of people, things, or ideas by some common factor.
2. A movement seen in the opposite limb when increased concentration, tone, or effort is exerted (e.g., increased elbow flexion in one arm while the other moves).
3. A functional connection of two ideas, events, or psychological phenomena established through learning or experience.
See also: conditioning
4. Statistical dependence between two or more events, characteristics, or other variables.
5. genetics A grouping of congenital anomalies found together more frequently than otherwise expected; the use of this term implies that the cause is unknown.
[L. as-socio, pp. -sociatus, to join to; ad + socius, companion]

association

a small natural grouping of plants which live together. The term originally denoted a whole habitat, e.g. a pine forest, but is now usually applied to much smaller groupings. Compare CONSOCIATION.

as·so·ci·a·tion

(ă-sō'sē-ā'shŭn)
A connection of people, things, or ideas by some common factor.
[L. as-socio, pp. -sociatus, to join to; ad + socius, companion]

Patient discussion about association

Q. is there ususlly strange feelings associated with seizures? I am 30 years and i have just been diagnosed with absence seizures. There are some strange feeing that i cannot identify as fear or fustration or anxiety or depression or sadness associated with this new illness. Is it normal? Can it be identified? How can i get rid of all the conditions associated with this disease as well as the absence seizure itself?

A. any affect that the seizures have on your personality (mood change and such)can go away if the condition will be treated. treating epilepsy seizures require first of all a good neurologist. he will help you the treatment that will suite you the most. there are more then one line of treatments in epilepsy.

Q. In what way the brain fog symptom associated with fibromyalgia? In what way the brain fog symptom associated with fibromyalgia? What are the other symptoms of fibromyalgia?

A. memory loss is also associated with Fibromyalgia...lack of concentration and you just feel like you are in a fog...can't remember....can't think. Our standing joke at my house is "I am in the "fog" today. The one thing my doctor ALWAYS reminds me of fibro affects people differently, remember you may not have all the sympoms or you may have ones others don't but fibromyalgia is widespread pain that has lasted 3 months or more, it is pain of the fibrous tissue - ligiments, tendons and muscles. You feel stiff and achy all over. There are trigger points such as neck, shoulders, spine and hips. Chronic fatigue taht is possibly related to the disturbed sleep patterns. Most suffers I have talked to have restless leg syndrome and headaches. Irritable bowl is associated but on that one I am lucky I haven't had the problem but have had swolling problems and vision problems...I hope this helps. Good Luck!

Q. WHAT ARE SOME EYE DISORDERS ASSOCIATED WITH ALLZHEIMERS POTAAQU? MY MOTHERS BRAIN DOES NOT TELL HER EYES WHAT IT IS SHE IS LOOKING AT? THE DOCTORS DIAGNOSED HER WITH ALLZHEIMERS FIRST AND REALLY DON'T KNOW FOR SURE IF IT IS CAUSED BY ALLZHEIMERS OR IF THE EYE DISORDER IS HER MAIN PROBLEM WITH MEMORY.

A. Sight problems can generally be divided into two broad categories - problems with the eyes (i.e. problems with converting the rays of light to electrical impulses, actually seeing) and problems with the brain (i.e. problems with interpreting what we actually see). If you suspect she has a problem with seeing, it may be worth to consult an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) - they can usually check if the eye functions well, even if the patient doesn't fully cooperate.

If the eyes are found to be OK, than problems with the brain are usually addressed by a neurologist (nerves and brain doctor), although it's not sure a problem in this level is treatable.

More discussions about association
References in periodicals archive ?
Impinges One tap captured "[The] monitoring associational "conversations generates a precise, freedom involving, at the other comprehensive record of end, The Juilliard a person's public School of Music, movements that reflects Brooklyn Law School, a wealth of detail Consolidated Radio about her familial, Artists, Western Union, political, Mercantile Commercial professional, Bank, several religious, and sexual restaurants....
(39) Fortunately for Flagg, the legislature intended for the Commonwealth's antidiscrimination statute to cover claims like Flagg's, where the complainant's handicapped spouse is covered by the company's health plan, but ultimately provided little guidance as to whether future associational discrimination claims under chapter 151, section 4(16) would extend beyond the scope of this case.
example, all have little or no associational element to them, yet are
No doubt the associational test will itself be tested because it hinges on present-day understandings of cohesiveness and communal acts.
"We thus conclude that the plaintiffs (GOP voters) have sufficiently demonstrated that Maryland's 2011 redistricting law violates the First Amendment by burdening both the plaintiffs' representational rights and associational rights based on their party affiliation and voting history."
In short, the associational rights of Virginia's political parties that are recognized and protected by 24.2-509(A) are taken away by 24.1-509(B) and given instead to a single individualthe incumbent.
This article explains the protections and limitations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) associational disability provision, and analyzes the differences between the ADA as compared to the Florida Civil Rights Act (FCRA) with respect to disability discrimination.
They say that mandatory membership in the State Bar does not impinge upon any associational freedoms of the First Amendment because State Bar dues are incurred for the purpose of improving the quality of the legal profession.
Filed late Friday in federal court, the lawsuit calls into question the "incongruity" between the separate deadlines to withdraw and to hand over the names, while arguing Farenthold's appearance on the ballot at this point would violate the "First Amendment associational rights" of the party.
For example, LGBT activists want the federal government to protect individual LGBT "rights" from local school and associational limitations.

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