assisted death


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Related to assisted death: Assisted dying, euthanasia

assisted death

Help that enables a person who wants to die to do so. The help may be counseling or providing the physical means or instruments that allow the person to commit suicide. The legal and ethical questions concerning such acts, esp. if the assisting person is a health care professional, are topics of active debate.
See: assisted suicide; euthanasia
See also: death
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1992, Sue Rodriguez brought her case for assisted death all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada.
The Criminal Code should be amended to expressly protect from the risk of criminal prosecution nurses who, in fulfilling in good faith their professional obligations, counsel, support and care for patients who inquire about or choose assisted death. (8) In making this recommendation, CNPS pointed out that given "the level of nursing care required by individuals who experience debilitating and terminal medical conditions, nurses will inevitably be involved with the care of patients who requires medically assisted death" (9).
With better end of life care overall, perhaps the need for assisted death will be less.
SIR Patrick Stewart's declaration of his wish to be allowed an assisted death, saddened me.
Supporters of the guidelines must be fully aware it is now a short step to the law introducing the conditions for assisted death now these new guidelines have been set out, and that is the most frightening element.
The author, who has Alzheimer's disease, will say that the "time is really coming" for assisted death to be legalised as he delivers the Richard Dimbleby Lecture.
Robert Young Medically Assisted Death. New York: Cambridge University Press 2007.
As I assess these cases and assisted death, there are two questions to be answered.
The Register Guard's absurd and unsubstantiated statement that 'physician assisted death ...
These programmes swung me towards assisted death in rare instances.
Abandoning restrictions commonly found in contemporary proposals for reform (76-84)--including "terminal illness" and "unbearable suffering"--Downie argues that any voluntary request for assisted death made by a competent individual should be honoured (12).
With half-brother Sam (James Hooton) facing arrest over the assisted death of his terminally-ill wife, Cain steps in to take the blame.