assist

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assist

Paranormal
noun A Scientology term for an action intended to help a person overcome effects of past mental trauma. 

Surgery
verb To support, help or be present during an operation.

ASSIST

American Stop Smoking Intervention Study. A grassroots initiative funded by the US government, which is intended to help individuals stop smoking based on the success of methods evaluated at the National Cancer Institute.
References in periodicals archive ?
The monthly cost of living in an assisted living center, which can range between $2,500 and $4,500, is monumental in comparison.
Rodriguez argued that the law against assisted suicide violated certain rights guaranteed by the Charter of Rights.
In the Second Circuit, the court ruled that a similar ban on assisted suicide in that district also violated the Fourteenth Amendment.
Heritage Assisted Living of Boise is a 100-unit assisted living facility in Boise, Idaho; Heritage Assisted Living of Twin Falls is a 70-unit assisted living facility in Twin Falls, Idaho; and Woodstone Assisted Living is an 85-unit assisted living facility also located in Twin Falls, according to the company.
Every sector--skilled nursing, assisted living, independent living and retirement community--will undergo a lot of change, Diaz added.
Mack: It was interesting that, at a recent national Seniors Commission hearing in San Diego, one member of the commission, a top person in assisted living, kept referring to aging in place--but, in this case, his place.
"Being a resident of our assisted living facility will be like living in a fine hotel," added Burman, who estimates that rents will be in the low $3,000 to low $4,000 per month range.
Supreme Court heard oral argument in two cases that could help decide the controversy surrounding physician assisted suicide.
The next important trend was the number of large assisted living portfolio sales that were completed, showing the beginnings of consolidation taking place in the industry.
"None of the Society's programs are intended to compete with existing trade associations," notes Assisted Living University's Peete.
Because of New York City's dearth of existing assisted living product, and plentiful pent-up demand from wealthy New Yorkers reaching retirement age, many companies have announced their intentions to penetrate the New York City assisted living market with new development in the past few years.
Meisel picked up on the Ninth Circuit Court's abortion language and its expansion of termination of life support to the right to assisted suicide, which he calls physician aid in dying.