assimilate

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assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

[əsim′əlāt]
Etymology: L, assimilare, to make alike
1 to absorb nutritive substances from the digestive tract to the circulatory system and convert them into living tissues.
2 to incorporate components of a new culture into existing values.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Community profiling and gene expression of fungal assimilatory nitrate reductases in agricultural soil.
Key themes of the broader literature relate to the functions immigrant and refugee organizations provide to their clients and the relative effectiveness of these organizations in facilitating the adaptation of refugees and immigrants with broader implications for research into the relative merits of assimilatory as opposed to ethnic solidarity adaptation strategies for refugees and immigrants in American society.
Completely abandoned by the Portuguese government, in contact with a more lively and assimilatory nationality [the British], the Macaenses, beginning to forget the language of their homeland, lose all the characteristics of nationality and sadly anglicize themselves.
Some states make use of accommodational policies to overcome this dichotomy, whereas others resort to assimilatory policies to eliminate inter-group differences.
The affirmation of a "collective self" and the resistance to the assimilatory vision of the Occident was lived like a battle in the midst of the neighborhoods and the imagination of their leaders, which were backed up by the concerned populations.
As China develops Xinjiang as a Central Asian economic, trade and transportation hub while maintaining travel restrictions on Uighurs and assimilatory in-migration, language and cultural policies, local and external factors--including influences from Pakistan and Afghanistan, which border Xinjiang--will play a part in Uighur militancy.
And so, as Hollywood is beholden to bottom lines, let me state mine directly: It is the balance between the real and the superhuman, the Jewish and the assimilatory, the quotidian and the uncanny, that the Jewish pioneers of comic books understood and that is lost on most directors today.
However, Reilly would have us believe that all of these issues stem from "corrupt" First Nations leaders instead of from years of colonial oppression and assimilatory policies like residential schools and the Indian Act.
However, the paradigm remained entrenched in government practice and removals and institutionalisation continued on alongside the recently introduced practices of adoption and fostering by white families, considered more suited to assimilatory goals.
Since the novel's characters cannot fully meet the requirements of the genre, Short History can fully commit itself to the assimilatory logic of the ethnic bildungsroman only at a level beyond character.
Furthermore, the presence of irregular patterns indicating a sound change in progress, as observed with the assimilatory processes, and token and speaker variation of several acoustic features, such as the aspiration and release of stops, VOT, and nasal duration, demonstrate that languages are dynamic systems.
Although their policies, designed to bring Maori into the modern world, have sometimes been criticized as assimilatory in nature, their focus was always on Maori as a race or ethnicity.