assimilate

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assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

[əsim′əlāt]
Etymology: L, assimilare, to make alike
1 to absorb nutritive substances from the digestive tract to the circulatory system and convert them into living tissues.
2 to incorporate components of a new culture into existing values.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kolb (1984) classified learning styles into Diverger, Assimilator, Converger, and Accommodator.
Then concrete experience scores is subtracted of the abstract conceptualization scores and the reflective observation scores is subtracted of the active experimentation scores, that these scores (AC-CE, AE-RO) represents the four learning styles: assimilator, diverger, converger, and accommodator [13].
According to LSI scores, a learner is categorized as an Accommodator, a Diverger, an Assimilator, or a Converger.
As the second dominant learning style, assimilators are best at understanding a wide range of information and putting it into a concise and logical form.
As a group, the participants categorized as assimilators organized their journals in an orderly manner, illustrating a characteristic of their group--an emphasis on logical thought.
Specifically, the culture assimilator and contrast-American techniques were developed with funding from the military, yet are rarely, if ever, used in military cultural training today.
Rather than being passive assimilators of European modernity, the Shona have taken an active role in the selection and at times fusion of what they got from Europe and what they already had as a people.
In recent times this fear has been countered by a discourse positioning Japan as great assimilators, able to absorb Western culture without losing their Japanese spirit (see Sakamoto 120).
Students with this approach to learning are described by Felder and Brent(13) as Type Two Assimilators.
Thirty-one percent of the nurses were accommodators, 20% were assimilators, 19% were convergers, and 20% were divergers.
Cultural assimilators are created to teach trainees how to interpret an event from the perspective of another culture and not immediately respond from our American inclination.
Assimilators get mainly involved with refining abstract theories rather than developing workable strategies and solutions.