assimilate

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assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this perspective, the results of the present study highlight that the heterogeneity in longitudinal assimilative and accommodative coping needs to be accounted for in future research.
The shift to the approach to environmental protection from assimilative capacity principle to precautionary principle began after 1972.
However, using rationalizations from the resource-based view of the firm, we identify two factors related to a firm's ability to benefit from resource extension acquisitions: assimilative capability of the firm and the experience gained from previous acquisitions.
In an assimilative political relationship, political minorities will never control political or policy outcomes, as a collective political unit, because of the lack of political solidarity that exists within the group and the absence of a political agenda.
Our research results also support the assumption of assimilative effect as proposed by Smith (2000).
20) Supporting a pedagogic shift of this magnitude presents significant challenges for existing Indigenous teacher education programs as many continue to be assimilative in orientation.
Tanselle is perhaps unduly harsh with librarians, forgetting their assimilative service role toward academics, who similarly did not recognize the importance of dust-jackets until recent decades.
By emergent tasks, we mean trying to figure out what to do when everything that we do is tied to a complicated and interactive milieu of incongruous actors and activities based in a setting that is interdependent, dynamic, and where convergent and assimilative forms or knowledge are inadequate to frame what is happening or not happening.
Knapp states that Shakespeare "never disowned mass entertainment for some more high-toned or exclusive pursuit" (147), yet the brilliant assimilative power he brought to the stage enriched it with literary resources that at times, such as in A Midsummer Night's Dream, seem temporarily to obliterate the difference between low and high.
While Kim's study brings fresh and insightful perspective on the Christian Holy Spirit, it is best seen as exploratory rather than assimilative. Thereby she succeeds in her intention.
The Kemalist revolution modeled itself after the French Republic's anti-clerical laicism and assimilative nationalism.