assimilate

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assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

[əsim′əlāt]
Etymology: L, assimilare, to make alike
1 to absorb nutritive substances from the digestive tract to the circulatory system and convert them into living tissues.
2 to incorporate components of a new culture into existing values.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The assimilation of <x> is standard, but intervocalic <c> usually remains [k], except in the example cited [[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]].
The nasal assimilation is usually reflected in the orthography.
It will be seen from the examples in the six categories above that assimilation is a phonological, not a phonetic construct.
The centralization of vowels in unstressed syllables (the so-called "weak" form) so characteristic of all English dialects qualifies as assimilation only insofar as it facilitates the articulation of surrounding consonants in rapid speech.
This is a further example of anticipatory assimilation, since the [m] changes according to the ensuing vowel.
First, not all native speakers develop identical instincts in terms of the degree of assimilation of adjacent sounds, even within the same dialect.
The voice teacher should be vigilant for variations in assimilation from EFL student to student.
For example, Donald Calvert's extensive discussion of assimilation in Descriptive Phonetics (New York: Tieme-Stratton, 1980) unfolds under the term coarticulation, which he defnes as "producing two sounds in sequence so that they infuence how each other is produced" (85).
Linguists ofen employ the umbrella term "accommodation" to include assimilation, dissimilation, co-articulation, and other forms of articulation change stemming from environmental conditions.
Regressive assimilation (in which a segment infuences the sound of a later one) is also known as perseverative assimilation.