cultural assimilation

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cultural assimilation

[kul′chərəl]
a process by which members of an ethnic minority group lose cultural characteristics that distinguish them from the dominant cultural group or take on the cultural characteristics of another group.
References in periodicals archive ?
More needs to be done on Imperial Japan's assimilationist policies and the ways they helped or hindered women.
His study of the 1927 Jazz Singer and its various remakes, indeed broadens our understanding of this classic assimilationist narrative through comparison with its anti-assimilationist Yiddish counterparts, The Cantor's Son (1937) and Overture to Glory (1940).
According to Obasi (2005), cultural distance will increase as the individual moves away from his/her original ethnic group in the following order: traditionalist [right arrow] integrationist [right arrow] assimilationist [right arrow] marginalist.
For instance, I thoroughly enjoyed her challenge to those critics who have deemed Esmeralda Santiago's When I was Puerto Rican as assimilationist.
Many feel their culture and language are being systematically undermined by assimilationist policies emanating from Bangkok.
Without that recognition, we run the risk of continuing the assimilationist policies and the social harms that were integral to the residential schools.
In this thought-provoking article, Larre complicates the interpretation of John Milton Oskison's writing as assimilationist, arguing that Oskison participated in a form of "sovereign constructive group action:' Larre offers a close reading of Oskison's texts, offering an analysis that extricates Oskison's writing from what Maureen Konkle has called "the assimilate-or-become-extinct" narrative.
The second model identified by the authors is the assimilationist model which can be referred to as a "one sided process of adaptation" according to the authors: immigrants are supposed to give up their distinctive linguistic, cultural or social characteristics and become indistinguishable from the majority population.
are influenced by paternalistic and assimilationist ideals.
Holcombe recommends this emphasis along with a view that eschews 'employment parity' for Aboriginal people on the grounds that it is a faint hope, and assimilationist.
Pragmatic because it looks at using existing channels to advance the 'Democrats need more people, artistic people' agenda; conservative because it is assimilationist in many ways.
The performance actively asserts indigenous Maori culture, and is also seen to contest assimilationist versions of Maori identity.