assimilate

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assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation excluded the preforecast time period during which TAMDAR observations were assimilated and so no TAMDAR observations that were assimilated were used for the verification.
We observed that between black and white individuals there was statistically significant difference in truncated shape (p=0.05), which was more frequent in black individuals; nodular shape (p=0.05) and assimilated shape (p=0.05) which were more frequent in white individuals.
"Many savants predicted a hundred years ago that the immigrants of their day could never be assimilated," he writes in his recent book The New Americans (Regnery).
They told Suzuki they cannot accept his claim that the Ainu people have been assimilated into Japan.
Vitamins are not pep pills (they have no caloric value of their own), food substitutes (they cannot be assimilated without ingesting food), or structural components; nor do they contribute substantially to body mass.
Caught in the entanglement produced by changing ideologies, the Jews of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Germany were not seduced and ultimately foiled by a nonexistent German reality, but were "painfully aware...that they were assimilated in the accusative -- and not assimilated in the dative....[T]hat is, they were not assimilated into German society" (3).
(1997), using a [sup.14]C-[CO.sub.2] pulse-labelling chamber technique (Saggar and Searle 1995), showed that above- and below-ground partitioning of photosynthetically fixed C was strongly influenced by phosphorus (P) fertility, with a greater proportion of assimilated C also partitioned below-ground under low P status.
American Jews have neither converted in any significant number nor assimilated. Historian Gerald Sorin, in his new book Tradition Transformed: The Jewish Experience in America, makes an excellent case that we have instead acculturated.
The total photoassimilation of radioactivity per plant was computed as the product of specific radioactivity of [sup.14][CO.sub.2] and the total [CO.sub.2] assimilated during the 3-h labeling period.
BEST is full of savvy advice on how to succeed without being assimilated. Subjects include organizational structure, getting a piece of the action and covering your butt.
It had taken nearly a century for the French romantic style of poetry to become assimilated into English literature; it was assimilated at about the same time that England as a nation had absorbed its French elements and become entirely English.
Request for quotations : Development of innovative technology for the production of easily assimilated concentrated additives based on local grain raw materials for young animals