aspirin resistance

aspirin resistance

The inability of aspirin to reduce platelet production of thromboxane A2 and consequently platelet activation and aggregation. Possible causes of aspirin resistance include inadequate dosage, interaction with other drugs, increased platelet turnover and mutations of genes concerned with thromboxane synthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aspirin is more active in male platelets, and aspirin resistance is more frequent in women.
But the underlying reason for aspirin resistance in compliant patients has long been questioned.
Recently, a number of studies have examined the association between aspirin resistance and several receptors on the surface of platelets, [sup][21] such as genetic polymorphisms of platelet membrane glycoproteins, genetic mutations of TBXA2R, the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and coagulation factor XIII.
Aspirin resistance is defined as persistent platelet activation (i.
Patients with acute ischemic stroke who test positive for aspirin resistance had both larger stroke volume and increased severity, compared with patients without resistance, in an observational study of 311 patients at Korean centers.
Testing aspirin resistance using the platelet function analyzer-100: some methodological caveats and considerations.
The resistance has close association with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and increased mortality, so that resolving the problem of aspirin resistance (AR) is widely concerned.
Assessment of aspirin resistance varies on a temporalbasis in patients with ischaemic heart disease.
Because aspirin levels sufficient to dampen platelet aggregation persist only for about 2 hours following a dose, faster platelet turnover leads to fewer platelets exposed to an adequate aspirin level, increased aspirin resistance, and greater thrombotic potential.
While aspirin still retains its status as the 'frontline' antiplatelet drug, aspirin resistance identified in 1978, initially in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and later in stroke patients.
Testing revealed aspirin resistance in 39 (42%) patients when the study group received aspirin once daffy, and in 16 patients (17%) when they were on the twice-daily regimen, a statistically significant difference.
The prevalence of aspirin resistance has been determined as 0.
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