Aspiration

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aspiration

 [as″pĭ-ra´shun]
inhalation of some foreign material; aspiration of vomitus, blood, or mucus may occur when a person is unconscious or under the effects of a general anesthetic, and can be avoided by keeping the head turned to the side and removing all such foreign material from the air passages.
A, Types of aspiration. A, Aspiration before swallow caused by reduced tongue control. B, Aspiration before swallow caused by absent swallow response. C, Aspiration during swallow caused by reduced laryngeal closure. D Aspiration after swallow caused by pooled material in pyriform sinuses overflowing into airway. From Logemann J: Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders, San Diego, College-Hill Press, 1983.
withdrawal of fluid by an aspirator; the method is widely used in hospitals, especially during surgery, to drain the area of the body being operated on and keep it clear of excess blood and other fluids to facilitate visualization of the surgical field. Sometimes after extensive surgery, suction drainage under the skin is used to speed the healing process.
meconium aspiration inhalation of meconium by the fetus or newborn, which may result in atelectasis, emphysema, pneumothorax, or pneumonia.
risk for aspiration a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for entry of gastric secretions, oropharyngeal secretions, solids, or fluids into the tracheobronchial passage.
vacuum aspiration a form of induced abortion in which the uterine contents are removed by application of a vacuum through a hollow curet or a cannula introduced into the uterus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

as·pi·ra·tion

(as'pi-rā'shŭn),
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas, fluid, or tissue from a body cavity or organ from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. The inspiratory sucking into the airways of fluid or any foreign material, especially gastric contents or food.
3. A surgical technique for cataract, requiring a small corneal incision, severance of the lens capsule, fragmentation of the lens material, and removal with a needle.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aspiration

(ăs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of breathing in; inhalation.
b. The act of drawing something, as liquid or a foreign object, into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
2. Medicine The process of removing fluids or gases from the body with a suction device.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

aspiration

1. Aspiration.
2. The withdrawal of fluid from a body cavity or a mass–eg a cyst with a needle and a syringe by suction or siphonage, such as a syringe. See Gastric aspiration, Paracentesis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

as·pi·ra·tion

(aspir-āshŭn)
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas or fluid from a body cavity, from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. Inhalation into the airways of fluid or foreign body (e.g., vomitus, food, fluid).
3. A surgical technique for treatment of cataract, requiring a small corneal incision, severance of the lens capsule, fragmentation of the lens material, and removal with a needle.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

aspiration

Drawing out of fluid by suction, usually by syringe and needle, but sometimes by mouth or pump suction through a plastic or rubber tube.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Aspiration

When solids or liquids that should be swallowed into the stomach are instead breathed into the respiratory system, or when substances from the outside environment are accidentally breathed into the lungs.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

as·pi·ra·tion

(aspir-āshŭn)
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas, fluid, or tissue from a body cavity or organ from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. The inspiratory sucking into the airways of fluid or any foreign material, especially gastric contents or food.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about Aspiration

Q. What Causes Aspiration Pneumonia? My father is hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia. What causes this?

A. Aspiration pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign material that enter the bronchial tree (air tubes), usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). Aspiration pneumonia represents a either a bacterial infection or a chemical inflammatory process due to inadequate swallowing mechanism.

More discussions about Aspiration
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References in periodicals archive ?
'We have the TN50 Youth Canvas that contains the views or aspirations of the young people about the future.
Idris Umar who was an on-time Senator while declaring his gubernatorial aspirations in Gombe Tuesday urged his supporters to avoid the politics of bitterness, violence, hate speeches and any form of political misconduct that will polarize Gombe State thereby harming others and heating up the polity.
Students' final grade aspiration was not affected by prior learning, with aspirations for each cohort being almost equivalent (Figure 1).
Massive oral contrast media aspirations are very rare but can be fatal since only supportive therapeutic measures are available.
It further suggests a shared understanding that aspirations matter.
Analysis of the data made it apparent that the aspirations and the preparedness to fulfil them varied with age, enough to be able to categorise respondents into three distinct cohorts.
But, according to Peter Kent, the school's headteacher, their aspirations to replicate this in Nuneaton were 'too high.'.
Cured in Cured in Two Cured in Total Converted Single Aspirations Three Cured with to Incision Aspiration Aspirations Aspirations & Drainage only 28 (66.6%) 6 (14.2%) 3 (7.1%) 37(88%) 5 (11.9%) P<0.015.
It requires the capability to generate resources necessary for the advancement of the shared aspirations. It requires the skill and savvy of striking that delicate balance and sustaining harmony during those times when human aspirations are not shared, when they collide, and conflict inevitably arises.
This study examined factors influencing STEM career aspirations of a nationally representative sample of 9th-grade students (N = 21,444).
Compiled by Neil Moxley Title odds: Betfair ASTON VILLA Manager: Steve Bruce Big signing: None so far Star man: Jack Grealish Title odds: 8/1 Season's aspirations: Too soon to say what the arrival of British football's third-richest owners could produce short term, but Bruce is a grind master in this division.
Chronic seromas can lead to infection, pain, frequent trips to have aspirations performed and increased patient anxiety.