Aspiration

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aspiration

 [as″pĭ-ra´shun]
inhalation of some foreign material; aspiration of vomitus, blood, or mucus may occur when a person is unconscious or under the effects of a general anesthetic, and can be avoided by keeping the head turned to the side and removing all such foreign material from the air passages.
A, Types of aspiration. A, Aspiration before swallow caused by reduced tongue control. B, Aspiration before swallow caused by absent swallow response. C, Aspiration during swallow caused by reduced laryngeal closure. D Aspiration after swallow caused by pooled material in pyriform sinuses overflowing into airway. From Logemann J: Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders, San Diego, College-Hill Press, 1983.
withdrawal of fluid by an aspirator; the method is widely used in hospitals, especially during surgery, to drain the area of the body being operated on and keep it clear of excess blood and other fluids to facilitate visualization of the surgical field. Sometimes after extensive surgery, suction drainage under the skin is used to speed the healing process.
meconium aspiration inhalation of meconium by the fetus or newborn, which may result in atelectasis, emphysema, pneumothorax, or pneumonia.
risk for aspiration a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for entry of gastric secretions, oropharyngeal secretions, solids, or fluids into the tracheobronchial passage.
vacuum aspiration a form of induced abortion in which the uterine contents are removed by application of a vacuum through a hollow curet or a cannula introduced into the uterus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

as·pi·ra·tion

(as'pi-rā'shŭn),
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas, fluid, or tissue from a body cavity or organ from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. The inspiratory sucking into the airways of fluid or any foreign material, especially gastric contents or food.
3. A surgical technique for cataract, requiring a small corneal incision, severance of the lens capsule, fragmentation of the lens material, and removal with a needle.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aspiration

(ăs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of breathing in; inhalation.
b. The act of drawing something, as liquid or a foreign object, into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
2. Medicine The process of removing fluids or gases from the body with a suction device.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

aspiration

1. Aspiration.
2. The withdrawal of fluid from a body cavity or a mass–eg a cyst with a needle and a syringe by suction or siphonage, such as a syringe. See Gastric aspiration, Paracentesis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

as·pi·ra·tion

(aspir-āshŭn)
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas or fluid from a body cavity, from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. Inhalation into the airways of fluid or foreign body (e.g., vomitus, food, fluid).
3. A surgical technique for treatment of cataract, requiring a small corneal incision, severance of the lens capsule, fragmentation of the lens material, and removal with a needle.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

aspiration

Drawing out of fluid by suction, usually by syringe and needle, but sometimes by mouth or pump suction through a plastic or rubber tube.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Aspiration

When solids or liquids that should be swallowed into the stomach are instead breathed into the respiratory system, or when substances from the outside environment are accidentally breathed into the lungs.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

as·pi·ra·tion

(aspir-āshŭn)
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas, fluid, or tissue from a body cavity or organ from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. The inspiratory sucking into the airways of fluid or any foreign material, especially gastric contents or food.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about Aspiration

Q. What Causes Aspiration Pneumonia? My father is hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia. What causes this?

A. Aspiration pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign material that enter the bronchial tree (air tubes), usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). Aspiration pneumonia represents a either a bacterial infection or a chemical inflammatory process due to inadequate swallowing mechanism.

More discussions about Aspiration
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References in periodicals archive ?
As I hope to demonstrate, the fundamental flaw of the aspirational view is that it conflates unenforced duties with aspirational ideals.
During the shopping trip for many food and beverage categories, there are micro-moments where the oscillations between the Aspirational Self and the Hedonic Self are rapid and frequent.
The IRS language for best practices is aspirational. Tax practitioners should embrace this approach as a tool to better operate their practices and be advocates for their clients.
The preamble to the new regulations, as recommended by the ABA Tax Section, describes the best practices guidelines as "aspirational," meaning that the regulations merely provide that the best practices constitute a standard that tax practitioners should seek to achieve as a goal.
Creating an aspirational environment for fragrance and making strong merchandising statements with new, heavily advertised brands are strategies that can work in the mass environment.
"It has continued to represent what it always represented--all things American, all things aspirational," Lynn Says.
Some years ago, Professor Lee Bollinger, then at the University of Michigan, explained the inconsistencies of First Amendment cases by calling the Amendment "aspirational" rather than a binding legal doctrine.
Abandoning the class structure as its aspirational system, fashion in this lifetime necessarily admires and assumes diversity, wherein style begins.
But it might also be helpful to view a document like the current Library Bill of Rights as an additional aspirational creed, something which provides more than minimal protection to library patrons and serves a purpose other than a bill of rights.
Summary: New Delhi [India], June 19 (ANI): The meeting of the heads of political parties under the chairmanship of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to discuss the concept of 'One Nation, One Election' among other things including NITI Aayog's proposal for developing 'Aspirational districts' is undergoing at Parliament today.
Turnure sees Spire's 2018 earnings as "unsustainable and supported by numerous one-time benefits." He also views the company's 4%-7% earnings growth expectation for 2019 as "aspirational." The analyst raised his price target for the shares to $72 from $68 and keeps an Underweight rating on the name.